delay

(redirected from delayer)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

delay

 [de-la´]
a postponement to a later time.
atrioventricular delay (AV delay) atrioventricular interval (def. 2).

delay

(dĕ-lā'),
1. In a medical sense, to put off for a time, either for clinical reasons or through physiologic dysfunction.
2. The elapsed time inherent in sense 1.

de·lay

(dĕ-lā')
Postponement or deferral to a later time.
[O.Fr. deslaier, fr. Germanic]
References in periodicals archive ?
The bishop and historian Paolo Giovio (1483-1552) called him 'fiercest warrior and extraordinary delayer' (accerrimus bellator et cunctator egregious); but he was completely wrong in saying that Sir John only arrived in Italy in 1368.
Counties in delayer states evidence increasing levels of toxic releases.
According to Guicciardini, Colonna's "cautious methods allowed no opportunity for [his enemy] to crush him; the innate deliberateness of his actions deservedly won him the title of 'Delayer.'" [98] In Fabian fashion, Colonna fought at Bicocca from a heavily fortified position, placing his Spanish and German troops behind earthern ramparts and in ditches.
has been that the structure and process of management should be "restructured"," decluttered", "delayered" and if necessary "downsized".
At the same time, successive recessions have forced companies to downsize, delayer and focus on their core activities.
To be more efficient, you want to delayer your staff organization in order to meet these challenges.
The novel opens with an emblematically Shavian scene, in the council of King Patayon, whose sobriquet "The Slow One" recalls Fabius ("The Delayer"), the Roman General whose policy of tactical delay inspired Fabianism as a political movement built upon a strategy of cautious advance.
Korea can serve as a facilitator or a delayer, a weakener or a strengthener, and so on.
The positive social cue interfered with the low delayer's ability to suppress his or her actions," explains Dr.
Then they head along Fabian Way, named after the Roman general nicknamed "The Delayer" because of his tactic of avoiding pitched battles against his skilful opponent Hannibal.
This mechanism has been described as a "delayer's charter" by Prof Bridges.