delayed-onset muscle soreness

delayed-onset muscle soreness

Abbreviation: DOMS
Muscle tenderness, decreased strength, and decreased range of motion that develops 12 to 24 hr following strenuous exercise and peaks in intensity between 24 to 48 hr, although symptoms may persist 72 hr or more. DOMS may result from microtearing of muscular fibers, lactic acid accumulation, local inflammatory response, and/or physiochemical changes within the muscle fibers. Muscle soreness is most pronounced following eccentric exercise. See: eccentric exercise; inflammation
See also: muscle soreness
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In the former, the treatment is applied by a therapist, in contrast, the latter, the individual uses their own body weight to apply pressure on a foam roller (FR) to produce friction, increasing muscular temperature and decreasing pain associated with delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) (Macdonald et al., 2014; Pearcey et al., 2015).
It has been shown to reduce pain and swelling for anyone suffering from low back pain, arthritis and delayed-onset muscle soreness."
The Efficacy of Sustained Heat Treatment on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness. Clin J Sport Med.
Foam rolling is a newer trend in the exercise world, but a handful of small studies suggest it can increase flexibility and reduce delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS).
Queme et al., "Bradykinin and nerve growth factor play pivotal roles in muscular mechanical hyperalgesia after exercise (delayed-onset muscle soreness)," Journal of Neuroscience, vol.
Effect of delayed-onset muscle soreness on elbow flexion strength and rate of velocity development.
"Spending time in an infrared sauna can (decrease the length of delayed-onset muscle soreness. The infrared rays actually increase the body's core temperature so it helps to break down fat-soluble toxins, increase circulation and bring W[section] oxygenated blood throughout the body."
Eccentric exercise-induced delayed-onset muscle soreness and changes in markers of muscle damage and inflammation.
High-intensity of exercise or unaccustomed eccentric exercise can cause the phenomenon of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage (EIMD) which usually results in cramps, muscle strain, impaired muscle function and delayed-onset muscle soreness (1).
Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is pain or discomfort that develops in muscles after exercise that is unfamiliar.
Subjects who took black tea extract produced significantly higher peak power and higher average mean power across intervals, and experienced significantly lower levels of delayed-onset muscle soreness 24 and 48 hours post-workout
However, EMA can cause muscle damage, which is characterized by the development of delayed-onset muscle soreness and swelling, decline of pain-free range of motion, as well as sustained loss of muscle force and range of motion.