delayed sleep phase


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Related to delayed sleep phase: Delayed sleep phase disorder

delayed sleep phase

Sleep disorders
1. A condition that occurs when the clock hour at which sleep normally occurs is moved back in time in a given, 24 hr sleep-wake cycle, causing a temporarily displaced–delayed occurrence of sleep in the 24 hr cycle.
2. Chronic sleep schedule disturbance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Delayed sleep phase syndrome: A chronobiological disorder with sleep-onset insomnia.
Adolescents who consistently do not feel refreshed when they awaken in the morning may experience a delayed sleep phase pattern consisting of symptoms of daytime sleepiness that contribute to a decline in well-being (Carskadon, 1990; Carskadon et al.
Melatonin may help with jet lag, night work, or delayed sleep phase syndrome.
The adolescent with difficulty waking up for school may be symptomatic of biological changes in the circadian system at puberty which shift sleep-timing preferences in the direction of the delayed sleep phase.
This method is better accepted in the advanced sleep phase than in the delayed sleep phase, because intermediate hours do not encompass the desired waking period.
Association of the length polymorphism in the human Per3 gene with the delayed sleep phase syndrome: does latitude have an influence on it?
Persons with delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD) live at a delayed phase that resists advancement and is incompatible with their personal and social obligations.
If you haven't diagnosed delayed sleep phase syndrome in some of your teenage patients, then you've missed this most common insomnia pattern of adolescents, a pediatric sleep specialist advised.
For patients with delayed sleep phase, he recommends exposure to bright light--as much as 10,000 amps--in the early morning and taking 0.
For patients with delayed sleep phase, he recommended ex- posure to bright light--as much as 10,000 amps--in the early morning and taking 0.
Some people with advanced or delayed sleep phase syndrome benefit from phototherapy, a treatment in which you are exposed to bright lights at certain times of the day to reset your circadian clock.
The percentage of respondents who recommended medication for insomnia one-half of the time or more was high in primary insomnia (75%) and delayed sleep phase syndrome (51%), as well as psychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorder (62%), posttraumatic stress disorder (59%), depressive disorders (53%), and anxiety disorders (43%).