deja


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Related to deja: ETRE, deja vu
An adverb referring to a group of paramnesias in which there is a perception of familiarity—déjà—for events that a person is known to have never previously experienced; déjà phenomena are associated with neurotic depersonalisation and temporal lobe epilepsy

déjà

French, previously Psychiatry A group of paramnesias in which there is a perception of being familiar with, or having previous–déjà–experiences which have not occurred, or complete absence–jamais–of memory for events known to have been experienced by the subject, each of which has been associated with neurotic depersonalization and temporal lobe epilepsy
References in periodicals archive ?
Adam Cecchetti, Deja vu Security's chief executive officer, said, "Today's announcement is an exciting new chapter for Deja vu Security and our employees.
Uday Gill, CEO Fibers at IVL explains the rationale and the aims for the DEJA brand: "IVL's heritage in pioneering recycling technology across 100% rPET flake, pellet, fiber and filament applications has enabled our performance-led product ingredients to achieve a global reputation as a quality, industry benchmark.
Deja Vu farms Pvt Ltd allegedly took unsecured loans of Rs84 million (Dh4.8 million) from Khan to purchase the land, the official said.
According to Deja, some blind people who tested her device said they were very happy with the innovation.
To begin, there were 73 entries in Deja Vu associated with Clinical Chemistry (at the time of the editorial publication) rather than 27 as previously reported-a discrepancy attributable to the database search and filter options (1).
Psychologist Dr Anne Cleary said: "One particular theory of deja vu is it may be a memory process.
"Deja Vu Dream" tells of Jennifer Jenssen and feeling that she is responsible for the accident that claimed her husband's life.
Nature, a leading American scientific journal, said that an Iranian scientific magazine was alerted to the potential plagiarism by Deja vu, a web database at the University of Texas that culls published articles with potential plagiarisms by computer matching of the texts.
By way of illustration, we offer an in-depth analysis of the synchronic uses and diachronic development of two cognate particles from two Romance languages, namely French deja and Italian gia, equivalent in some of their most salient uses to English already.