deinstitutionalize

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deinstitutionalize

(dē-ĭn′stĭ-to͞o′shə-nə-līz′, -tyo͞o′-)
tr.v. deinstitutional·ized, deinstitutional·izing, deinstitutional·izes
1. To remove the status of an institution from.
2. To release (a mental health patient, for example) from an institution for placement and care in the community.

de·in′sti·tu′tion·al·i·za′tion (-lĭ-zā′shən) n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In spite of the high prevalence of elderly patients in the long-term population of psychiatric hospitals, most studies that look at deinstitutionalizing people to community residential units excludes the elderly with mental disorders (8).
2 (1996): 277-316; Fukuyama, The Great Disruption; Nock, "The Social Costs of Deinstitutionalizing Marriage"; Aguirre, "The Family and Economic Development"; idem, Determinants of Economic Growth; idem, Family Structure and the Process of Economic Growth; idem, "Revisiting Altruism in the Family"; and Maria Sophia Aguirre and Martha Cruz Zuniga, "The Impact of Remittances on Economic Growth: Fixed and Human Capital," Mimeo (2010), among others.
Power identifies this as key to deinstitutionalizing the environment.
Likewise, the final chapter on serial killing props this innovation in the genre against the anti-psychiatric movement that began in the 1960s and led to the deinstitutionalizing of the mentally ill over the course of the next thirty years.
Stalder reminded attendees that when the country began deinstitutionalizing in the 1950s and 1960s, individuals with mental illness forgot that services must be provided in the community.
Within this publication, the FACJJ also presents a report on national compliance with the four core protections of the JJDP Act of 2008, which include deinstitutionalizing status offenders and nonoffenders; separating adult and juvenile offenders in secure institutions; eliminating the practice of detaining or confining juveniles in adult jails and lockups; and addressing the disproportionate number of minority youth who come into contact with the juvenile justice system.
The Green House concept of deinstitutionalizing long-term care residences is not new.
Officially recognizing genderless marriage, and thereby deinstitutionalizing man-woman marriage, will first diminish and then largely eliminate the latter institution's valuable and unique social goods.
Never again should we abandon the mentally ill in the name of deinstitutionalizing them.
Ultimately, in both cases paradoxically enough the (literary) museum emerges as a supreme deinstitutionalizing power.
Bimber says this "deinstitutionalizing" will help environmental groups reach what he calls "light greens"--the majority of Americans who consider themselves environmentalists, but can't necessarily be counted on to vote or take action on environmental issues.