deinstitutionalize

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deinstitutionalize

(dē-ĭn′stĭ-to͞o′shə-nə-līz′, -tyo͞o′-)
tr.v. deinstitutional·ized, deinstitutional·izing, deinstitutional·izes
1. To remove the status of an institution from.
2. To release (a mental health patient, for example) from an institution for placement and care in the community.

de·in′sti·tu′tion·al·i·za′tion (-lĭ-zā′shən) n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
How can significance tests be deinstitutionalized? Organizational Research Methods, 5, 199-228.
Among other dimensions, these studies normally look at aspects related to functioning or social behavior of those in the process of being deinstitutionalized. A substantial number of people with severe mental health problems, especially those diagnosed in the schizophrenia spectrum, suffer significant amounts of personal, domestic, family and labor disabilities.
Besides the deinstitutionalized dining that this program offered with the wonderful smells wafting off of the Cuisine carts, we also felt that appetites would benefit as well as resident's weights would increase.
Paulson confronts the fact that in the quarter of a century after 1960, state hospitals shut down and deinstitutionalized (DI) several hundred thousand people.
A Policy Framework on Decentralized and Deinstitutionalized Management for South Africa.
He dreamed of a church ' where the sacraments would be deinstitutionalized and become central to faith and community once again.
A two-story floor-to-ceiling glass atrium, with a grand glass, steel, and limestone stairway, provides the warm, deinstitutionalized sensibility the design team sought.
With the squeeze on housing came mass evictions, mounting homelessness, waves of newly deinstitutionalized individuals with mental illness, the scourge of crack cocaine and finally a hurricane-scale health crisis--epidemic levels of hepatitis C and HIV/AIDs due to needle sharing, as well as a fearsome spike in drug overdose deaths involving a lethal cocktail of booze, legal and illegal drugs, and poverty.
(1983) examined the mortality rate of 1,033 deinstitutionalized patients.
We will move gradually from the status quo through the creation of a stronger LTC safety net via reforms to Medicaid, including more standardized eligibility and deinstitutionalized care.
Connecticut, for example, deinstitutionalized the majority of their troubled youth years ago and is currently reaping the benefits of moving to a carefully researched, more affordable, intensive community-based alternative The program that has had the greatest impact with challenging at-risk youth in that state (and elsewhere) has been Multi-Systemic Therapy; or MST.