deinstitutionalize


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deinstitutionalize

(dē-ĭn′stĭ-to͞o′shə-nə-līz′, -tyo͞o′-)
tr.v. deinstitutional·ized, deinstitutional·izing, deinstitutional·izes
1. To remove the status of an institution from.
2. To release (a mental health patient, for example) from an institution for placement and care in the community.

de·in′sti·tu′tion·al·i·za′tion (-lĭ-zā′shən) n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(49) Professor Raz captures the reality well when he observes that the law's role relative to man-woman marriage and other pre-political institutions is "to give them formal recognition, bring legal and administrative arrangements into line with them, facilitate their use by members of the community who wish to do so, and encourage the transmission of belief in their value to future generations." (50) Thus, when a same-sex couple successfully asserts a "right to marry," they are not imposing on the state a correlative duty to allow them into the existing man-woman marriage institution--which the law is impotent to do, (51) although it is sufficiently potent to deinstitutionalize man-woman marriage.
Put into effect, these four elements would deinstitutionalize services and make way for such quality-of-life innovations as the daily chef's special, all-private suites, therapeutic spa experiences, employee programs emphasizing profession and career as a norm, and more.
The 1970s witnessed widespread efforts to deinstitutionalize or "decarcerate" youngsters, moving them from secure detention centers and training schools to community-based programs that emphasized education and rehabilitation.
In fact, what Kalokyris does on all these occasions is, like Piglia, to deinstitutionalize and undermine the classifying methods of rationalism from the inside.
What about the dissolution of Social Security or other social welfare benefits should Dubya and those who control his administration deinstitutionalize those benefits in favor of their wealthy patrons?
Yes, the states performed abysmally in this field in the past, but that was because federal programs beginning in the 1960s unwittingly created massive incentives to "deinstitutionalize" the mentally ill Experimental programs in a half-dozen states could serve as a first step.
Her goal with Final Passages is "to re-introduce the concept of funerals in the home as a part of family life and as a way to deinstitutionalize death." Through this nonprofit project, she provides information and education, and through her own for-profit company, Home and Family Funerals, she offers her death midwife services.
The crusade to deinstitutionalize the mentally disabled grew directly out of the general reform aura of the 1960s.
* A number of court cases resulted in court orders to deinstitutionalize persons with developmental disabilities.(1)
The latter group was served primarily through the mental health system before the movement to deinstitutionalize. Although drug treatment slots have declined by more than 50 percent since the early 1990s, 60 percent to 80 percent of the inmate population has a history of substance abuse (DiMascio, 1995; Schlosser, 1998).
By this process, in other words, we deinstitutionalize our President, and destabilize ourselves.
"All of this will combine to deinstitutionalize health care with the focus of the system moving back from the hospital to the primary care physician," added Streck.