dehorn

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dehorn

(dē-hôrn′)
tr.v. de·horned, de·horning, de·horns
1. To remove the horns from.
2. To prevent growth of the horns of (cattle, for example), as by cauterization.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The white rhino that Naylor's crew has just dehorned has been given an antidote to the tranquilizer, and is starting to come round.
"Poachers have shown that even if the animal has been dehorned, what they'll do is they'll kill the animal anyway .
"When we came to the guest house the next morning the rhino lay on its side dehorned," said Susan Lottering, the bemused owner of the farm near Jeffreys Bay in the south of the country.
The Salers, which originates from the Massif Centrale region of France, is much admired there for magnificence of its lyre-shaped horns, but these present practical problems in modern farming systems, and most cattle have to be dehorned as a calf.
Cows and pigs are castrated without pain relief, dehorned, branded.
The magazine well has been contoured for carry and the frame and slide are dehorned. It features gray VZ Gator Back grips and black Perma Kote finish.
To prevent crowded, stressed animals from injuring each other or their handlers, dairy cattle are dehorned, without painkillers or anesthetics.
A deer, badger or rabbit that never learned its green cross code has not been dehorned, debeaked, castrated or transported in lorries, so those who eat them claim the moral high ground over farmed meats.
"And some poachers kill dehorned rhinos just so they don't track the same animal again the next week" he adds.
Would dehorned females be able to protect themselves and their calves from predators?
"To ensure that animals will not injure each other, they are dehorned with a chemical paste that burns out the roots of their horns." Rifkin continues the horror story by describing the wide range of hormones and steroids fed to the cattle schedules for slaughter.