dehisce

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dehisce

(dĕ'his),
To burst.

dehisce

(dĭ-hĭs′)
intr.v. de·hisced, de·hiscing, de·hisces
1. Botany To open at definite places, discharging seeds, pollen, or other contents, as the ripe capsules or pods of some plants.
2. Medicine To rupture or break open, as a surgical wound.

dehisce

verb To have opened, as may occur in a recently closed wound in which the sutures or staples have failed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Anterior missing teeth coupled with dehiscence makes it more challenging.
Recently, the relationship between the hearing threshold and the size (or location) of dehiscence has been studied to examine the mechanisms of SSCD syndrome and develop protocols for screening SSCD patients [9].
Edel, "Alveolar bone fenestrations and dehiscences in dry Bedouin jaws," Journal of Clinical Periodontology, vol.
(3) They found tympanic segment dehiscence in 78 cases and mastoid segment dehiscence in 5 cases.
Treating bacterial vaginosis, Trichomonas vaginalis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia can decrease the risk of cuff cellulitis and dehiscence. (3)
have compared the actual clinical findings in 357 operated cases with 300 temporal bones and have reported fallopian canal dehiscence in 6.4% of the operations and 29.3% of the autopsies.
In light of such advancements, we decided to retrospectively review our results of the past 5 years since we began to utilize this single-stage technique of debridement, internal fixation of the sternum, pectoralis major musculocutaneous advancement flaps, and primary closure used in patients with sternal dehiscence following median sternotomy.
Because posterior semicircular canal dehiscence is relatively rare, its clinical implications remain unclear, particularly in a case with bilateral involvement.
Differences in surgical technique may account for the higher rates of cuff dehiscence with laparoscopic and robotic hysterectomy.
Male patients outnumber women by at least 2 to 1 for wound dehiscence (Hanif et al., 2000).
Before her study, there had not been a report on wound dehiscence after obstetric or gynecologic surgery since 1977, she said at the meeting, which was held jointly with the annual meetings of Districts VI, VII, and IX of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.