dehisce


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dehisce

(dĕ'his),
To burst.

dehisce

(dĭ-hĭs′)
intr.v. de·hisced, de·hiscing, de·hisces
1. Botany To open at definite places, discharging seeds, pollen, or other contents, as the ripe capsules or pods of some plants.
2. Medicine To rupture or break open, as a surgical wound.

dehisce

verb To have opened, as may occur in a recently closed wound in which the sutures or staples have failed.
References in periodicals archive ?
with large trees native to western Malaysia, Sumatra, Borneo, is an exception, having 3-winged fruits that dehisce into three valves as well illustrated by Leenhouts (1956).
Follicles dehisce in late August-early September releasing wind-dispersed seeds.
Once anthers began to dehisce, polyads were also collected: the numbers increased as dehiscence took place, and then decreased as they were removed by pollinators.
When fruits mature in early October through November the capsules turn black and dehisce.
They flower in the first weeks after snow melt and senesce and dehisce seeds prior to the majority of bear activity, which occurs in these meadows from mid-August into October (avalanche chutes are not included in our study).
Plants observed in the field or cultivated in the greenhouse require no hand pollination to achieve nearly 100% fruit set; anthers dehisce within the bud of a flower before it opens.
These cupules are usually armed with spines but dehisce at maturity to expose and release the nut.
After collection, mature fruits of these two species were placed in ambient laboratory conditions for several days to allow them to dry and dehisce.
During the 3-5 d long male phase, one to two anthers, out of a total of six, dehisce daily.
Anthers failed to dehisce and only 12% of pollen stained using KI.
In warm weather and at high atmospheric and soil humidity, anthers dehisce faster with as few as 45 to 50% fertile pollen grains produced as compared with >65% fertile grains found in dehisced anthers under normal weather conditions (De Vries, 1971).
By midsummer, flowers develop into large ([approximately] 3-6 cm long) legumes, from which seeds dehisce explosively in late summer.