degree


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degree

 [dĕ-gre´]
1. a grade or rank within a series, especially a rank awarded to scholars by a college or university.
2. a unit of measure of temperature.
3. a unit of measure of arcs and angles, one degree being 1/360 of a circle.
4. one of the ranks or stages in a progressive series.
d's of freedom (df) the number of ways that the members of a sample can vary independently. For example, if a sample contains n scores and the sum of those scores is known, n − 1 scores are free to vary; the nth score, however, is not free to vary but is determined by the values of the other scores and the established sum of the scores. In this example, the degrees of freedom equal the sample size minus 1 (df = n − 1).

de·gree

(dĕ-grē'),
1. One of the divisions on the scale of a measuring instrument such as a thermometer, barometer, etc. see Comparative Temperature Scales appendix.
2. The 360th part of the circumference of a circle.
3. A position or rank within a graded series.
4. A measure of damage to tissue.
[Fr. degré; L. gradus, a step]

degree

(dĭ-grē′)
n.
1. A unit of measure on a temperature scale.
2. One of a series of steps in a process, course, or progression; a stage.
3. A classification of the severity of an injury, especially a burn.

degree (deg)

Etymology: Fr, degre
one of the divisions or intervals marked on a scale of units of measurement.

degree

Academentia A document that indicates completion of a course of study

de·gree

(dĕ-grē')
1. One of the divisions on the scale of a measuring instrument such as a thermometer or barometer. seescale.
2. The 360th part of the circumference of a circle.
3. A position or rank within a graded series.
4. A measure of damage to tissue.
[Fr. degré; L. gradus, a step]

de·gree

(dĕ-grē')
1. One of the divisions on the scale of a measuring instrument such as a thermometer or barometer.
2. The 360th part of the circumference of a circle.
3. A position or rank within a graded series.
4. A measure of damage to tissue.
[Fr. degré; L. gradus, a step]

degree

1. a grade or rank awarded scholars by a college or university.
2. a unit of measure of temperature.
3. a unit of measure of arcs and angles, one degree being 1/360 of a circle.

Patient discussion about degree

Q. What are first, second and third degree burns? What’s the difference between them and do they get treated in a different way?

A. Pain management for burns can be difficult since burns differ in type and severity. There are three types of burns:

First-degree burns are considered mild compared to other burns. They result in pain and reddening of the epidermis (outer layer of the skin).

Second-degree burns affect the epidermis and the dermis (lower layer of skin). They cause pain, redness, swelling, and blistering.

Third-degree burns go through the dermis and affect deeper tissues. They result in white or blackened, charred skin that may be numb.
Hope this helps.

http://www.webmd.com/pain-management/guide/pain-caused-by-burns

Q. Can someone know what sport requires the highest degree of fitness from its athletes? I wanted to be a great sportsman. I am from a family where fitness is given least importance. My father is diabetic and my mom from obesity. They have sick lifestyle and weird food pattern. They do not exercise at all and would laugh at me every time when I wear my shoes. I am normal but they just ignore me and think that I cannot be a sportsman. I would love to get moving and show this world that I can achieve my dreams. May father want me to help him and he is a truck driver. He eats 10 times per day and has never tried exercising his whole life. Already doctors have advice him and found that he has more cholesterol but he just phewphews them laughing. I think I have a great lesson from my parents on how not to be and I am very much interested in sports. Can someone know what sport requires the highest degree of fitness from its athletes?

A. it's good to hear you are taking responsibility over your health, it's not taken for granted. most sports, if you want to get in to Olympic standard,needs a great fitness. but i can tell you that swimming needs great physical strength, so is running and bicycle racing. so you can go do triathlon!

Q. What is the difference between MD an ND? I saw an ad for some pain reliving therapy with the degree ND attached to the therapist name. Is it the same as MD? Is this therapist a doctor? What does it mean?

A. You can read more about it in wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctor_of_Naturopathic_Medicine . You should notice that in many states this degree isn’t regulated, so essentially anyone can entitle himself as ND.

More discussions about degree
References in classic literature ?
Ferguson carefully noted the fact, that he had stopped at four degrees north latitude and seventeen degrees west longitude.
They next made for the first of the great lakes, the one named Tanganayika, situated between the third and eighth degrees of south latitude.
There Burton, who was completely worn out, lay ill for several months, during which time Speke made a push to the northward of more than three hundred miles, going as far as Lake Okeracua, which he came in sight of on the 3d of August; but he could descry only the opening of it at latitude two degrees thirty minutes.
During the next three hours we passed through ten miles of ice, eventually emerging into another series of ammonia-impregnated strata, where the mercury again fell to ten degrees below zero.
At four hundred miles the temperature had reached 153 degrees.
For another hour I saw that pitiless column of mercury rise and rise until at four hundred and ten miles it stood at 153 degrees.
In conferring the honorary degree of Master of Arts upon the Principal of Tuskegee Institute, Harvard University has honoured itself as well as the object of this distinction.
Washington is the first of his race to receive an honorary degree from a New England university.
It is Harvard which, first among New England colleges, confers an honorary degree upon a black man.
On the other hand, the points in which species differ from other species of the same genus, are called specific characters; and as these specific characters have varied and come to differ within the period of the branching off of the species from a common progenitor, it is probable that they should still often be in some degree variable,--at least more variable than those parts of the organisation which have for a very long period remained constant.
But the best evidence is afforded by parts or organs of an important and uniform nature occasionally varying so as to acquire, in some degree, the character of the same part or organ in an allied species.
The iceberg was by degrees becoming an ice-field, the mountain a plain.