degrade

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degrade

(dĭ-grād′)
v. de·graded, de·grading, de·grades
v.tr.
1. To reduce in grade, rank, or status; demote.
2. To cause (an organic compound) to undergo degradation.
v.intr.
1. To fall to a lower rank or status.
2. To undergo degradation; decompose: a chemical that degrades rapidly.

de·grad′er n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Each chapter of Degraded Work is a whirlwind of information, exploring numerous topics such as the food retail and construction industries (at both national and local levels), the city of Chicago, local-serving businesses vs.
The company said that its product is able to analyse small amounts of highly degraded DNA from FFPE samples quickly.
The use of fast-growing indigenous tropical tree species to rehabilitate and restore many degraded tropical forest ecosystems is based on this potential of different species to influence the soil fertility and ecological processes (Brown and Lugo, 1994).
Around 40 million of Russia's population of 142 million live in environmentally degraded areas.
But according to a new study published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, these degraded forests have similar levels of biodiversity to primary forest, retaining up to three quarters of the original species.
In short, without forests we're in serious trouble, yet they are still being lost and degraded at an alarming rate.
The tallest plants were observed in the pots filled with fallowed soil + tithonia both at 4 and 6 WAP, these were not significantly different from those recorded for fallowed soil + NPK, used soil + tithonia, degraded soil + tithonia and fallowed soil.
The bubbles expand and condense into a liquid that solvates and softens degraded resins and remnants of the previous color or material.
This result could be expected since fungal degradation and depolymerization of a lignocellulosic substrate suggests that degraded straw has reduced thermal stability (Beall et al.
Restoration of oyster habitat in North Carolina's Pamlico Sound, the most degraded New World site in the study, "would have a profound effect on biodiversity, the production of economically valuable species, and filtration" Lenihan says.
In Indonesia, 42,000 trees to begin restoration of degraded forest and coastal areas hard hit by logging, fires, and natural disasters, most notably the 2004 earthquake and resulting tsunami.