degradation

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degradation

 [deg″rah-da´shun]
conversion of a chemical compound to one less complex, as by splitting off one or more groups of atoms. See also lysis.

deg·ra·da·tion

(deg'ră-dā'shŭn),
The change of a chemical compound into a less complex compound.
[L. degradatus, degrade]

degradation

/deg·ra·da·tion/ (deg″rah-da´shun) conversion of a chemical compound to one less complex, as by splitting off one or more groups of atoms.

degradation

(dĕg′rə-dā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of degrading.
2. The state of being degraded; degeneration.
3. A decline to a lower condition, quality, or level.
4. Chemistry Decomposition of a compound, especially complex substances such as polymers and proteins, by stages, exhibiting well-defined intermediate products.

deg′ra·da′tive adj.

degradation

[di′grədā′shən]
Etymology: L, de + gradu, step
the conversion of a chemical compound to a less complex compound, usually by splitting off one or more groups or subgroups of atoms, as in deamination. degrade, adj.

deg·ra·da·tion

(deg'ră-dā'shŭn)
The change of a chemical compound into a less complex compound.
[L. degradatus, degrade]

deg·ra·da·tion

(deg'ră-dā'shŭn)
The change of a chemical compound into a less complex compound.
[L. degradatus, degrade]

degradation (deg´rədā´shən),

n the reduction of a chemical compound to a less complex compound.

degradation

conversion of a chemical compound to one less complex, as by splitting off one or more groups of atoms.
References in periodicals archive ?
These results suggest that the anti-migration effect of EEAC is related to the inhibition of the enzymatically degradative processes of CL1-0 migration.
Some of the degradative activities that have evolved not only constitute remarkable case studies of the influence of human activities upon natural evolutionary processes, but also form a source of significant biotechnological potential, and the basis of strategies to reduce the environmental impacts of hazardous wastes residues by bioremediation.
When the fungi attack the wood, a range of degradative extracellular, enzymatic and nonenzymatic activities are produced which chemically and morphologically alter the substrate, resulting in three main types of rot: white, brown and soft (Blanchette, 1995).
His close colleague, Alex Glazer, who carried out fundamental work on phycobiliproteins in a photosynthetic antenna (2 ), put forward a general hypothesis that end products of degradative metabolic pathways may play important roles as protective agents and that in this context bilirubin is a likely candidate for such a role.
The degradative oxidation of polyethylene can lead to the formation of the carbonyl chemical functionality.
PKC activates the degradative enzyme, ECE (endothelin converting enzyme) that effectively degrades A[beta] that has already been formed.
2000) have been examined for endosulfan degradation, these fungi were isolated for other degradative activities.
The oxidative and hydrolytic degradative nature of biodiesel was well-demonstrated in the study, as the acid value and water content of the biodiesel increased from 0.
In the case of the HPV chemicals under consideration, high sorption values among hydrophobic chemicals caused them to stick to other particles and be sequestered from the degradative processes used to treat wastewater.
Rhizosphere microbial community and hexachlorocyclohexane degradative potential in contrasting plant species.
It comprises the G-protein coupled cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, their endogenous lipid ligands, the endocannabinoids (ECs), and associated proteins (transporters, biosynthetic and degradative enzymes).
Localization of degradative enzymes and their inhibitors in the degenerate human intervertebral disc.