deformation

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deformation

 [de″for-ma´shun]
1. deformity, especially an alteration in shape or structure.
2. the process of adapting in shape or form.
elastic deformation temporary elongation of tissue when a prolonged force has been applied. See also creep.
plastic deformation permanent elongation of tissue when a prolonged nondisruptive mechanical force has been applied. See also creep.

de·for·ma·tion

(dē'fōr-mā'shŭn),
1. Deviation of form from normal; specifically, an alteration in shape and/or structure of an organ or other body part; etiology may be developmental, posttraumatic, hereditary, or postsurgical, or due to pathologic conditions in adjacent structures (for example, compression by a tumor mass).
2. In rheology, the change in the physical shape of a mass by applied stress.
[L. de-formo, pp. -atus, to deform, fr. forma, form]

deformation

/de·for·ma·tion/ (de″for-ma´shun)
1. in dysmorphology, a type of structural defect characterized by the abnormal form or position of a body part, caused by a nondisruptive mechanical force.
2. the process of adapting in shape or form.

deformation

(dē′fôr-mā′shən, dĕf′ər-)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of deforming.
b. The condition of being deformed.
2. An alteration of form for the worse.
3. Physics
a. An alteration of shape, as by pressure or stress.
b. The shape that results from such an alteration.

de′for·ma′tion·al adj.
Any change in the normal size or shape of a part

deformation

Deformity Neonatology A change from the normal size or shape of a part that differentiates normally, but cannot develop fully due to in utero constraints–eg, compression, or oligohydramnios. See Defect, Dysmorphology.

de·for·ma·tion

(dē-fōr-mā'shŭn)
1. Deviation of form from normal; specifically, an alteration in shape or structure of a previously normally formed part. It occurs after organogenesis and often involves the musculoskeletal system (e.g., clubfoot).
2. Synonym(s): deformity.
3. rheology The change in the physical shape of a mass by applied stress.
[L. de-formo, pp. -atus, to deform, fr. forma, form]

de·for·ma·tion

(dē-fōr-mā'shŭn)
Deviation of form from normal; specifically, an alteration in shape and/or structure of a body part.
[L. de-formo, pp. -atus, to deform, fr. forma, form]

deformation (dē´fôrmā´shən),

n a distortion; a disfigurement.
deformation, elastic,
n the change in shape of an object under an applied load from which the object can recover or return to its original unloaded state when the load is removed.
deformation, inelastic,
n a deformation occurring when a material is stressed beyond its elastic limit.
deformation, permanent,
n a deformation occurring beyond the yield point so that the structure will not return to its original dimensions after removal of the applied force.

deformation

1. deformity, especially an alteration in shape or structure.
2. the process of adapting in shape or form.
References in periodicals archive ?
Permanent deformations of the lower plate amounted to 87 mm, and for the upper plate- 29 mm.
There was a test proposed in this work to check, if some mining conditions may lead to creation of such deformations.
It aims to investigate and analyse the relations of deformation conditions in terms of strain level, deformation temperatures and strain rates with cooling rates, and martensite phase transformation in terms of transformation temperatures and post hardness.
One of the advantages of using AE method is to globally monitor the deformation and fracture behaviors in samples with high sensitivity.
In elastic deformation, the rotation matrix represents rigid body rotation of the material, which does not involve length change.
The complete analysis on the moisture distribution and the behaviour of deformations was performed for beech wood samples in different drying conditions at various drying times.
In general it is difficult to find explicit examples of the non-Schlesinger deformations (see, for instance, [1,2] for more examples and a discussion).
The objective of the present paper is the study of the elliptic, and more importantly, the wave shaped mechanical deformations of transformer windings only.
Lowrie's argument against shock deformation as a possible explanation for metal bending PK sounds good at first blush.
Deformation in this region is completely recoverable upon removal of the stress.
Localised plastic deformations were researched at deformation states within interval [beta] = (-1/2;0).
Very fine ferrite grains were again found in both microstructures and high hardness values were therefore measured for both strategies, reaching 170 HV10 for strategy with incremental deformation and even 180 HV10 for the strategy with two deformations.