deformation


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Related to deformation: Plastic deformation

deformation

 [de″for-ma´shun]
1. deformity, especially an alteration in shape or structure.
2. the process of adapting in shape or form.
elastic deformation temporary elongation of tissue when a prolonged force has been applied. See also creep.
plastic deformation permanent elongation of tissue when a prolonged nondisruptive mechanical force has been applied. See also creep.

de·for·ma·tion

(dē'fōr-mā'shŭn),
1. Deviation of form from normal; specifically, an alteration in shape and/or structure of an organ or other body part; etiology may be developmental, posttraumatic, hereditary, or postsurgical, or due to pathologic conditions in adjacent structures (for example, compression by a tumor mass).
2. In rheology, the change in the physical shape of a mass by applied stress.
[L. de-formo, pp. -atus, to deform, fr. forma, form]

deformation

/de·for·ma·tion/ (de″for-ma´shun)
1. in dysmorphology, a type of structural defect characterized by the abnormal form or position of a body part, caused by a nondisruptive mechanical force.
2. the process of adapting in shape or form.

deformation

(dē′fôr-mā′shən, dĕf′ər-)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of deforming.
b. The condition of being deformed.
2. An alteration of form for the worse.
3. Physics
a. An alteration of shape, as by pressure or stress.
b. The shape that results from such an alteration.

de′for·ma′tion·al adj.
Any change in the normal size or shape of a part

deformation

Deformity Neonatology A change from the normal size or shape of a part that differentiates normally, but cannot develop fully due to in utero constraints–eg, compression, or oligohydramnios. See Defect, Dysmorphology.

de·for·ma·tion

(dē-fōr-mā'shŭn)
1. Deviation of form from normal; specifically, an alteration in shape or structure of a previously normally formed part. It occurs after organogenesis and often involves the musculoskeletal system (e.g., clubfoot).
2. Synonym(s): deformity.
3. rheology The change in the physical shape of a mass by applied stress.
[L. de-formo, pp. -atus, to deform, fr. forma, form]

de·for·ma·tion

(dē-fōr-mā'shŭn)
Deviation of form from normal; specifically, an alteration in shape and/or structure of a body part.
[L. de-formo, pp. -atus, to deform, fr. forma, form]

deformation (dē´fôrmā´shən),

n a distortion; a disfigurement.
deformation, elastic,
n the change in shape of an object under an applied load from which the object can recover or return to its original unloaded state when the load is removed.
deformation, inelastic,
n a deformation occurring when a material is stressed beyond its elastic limit.
deformation, permanent,
n a deformation occurring beyond the yield point so that the structure will not return to its original dimensions after removal of the applied force.

deformation

1. deformity, especially an alteration in shape or structure.
2. the process of adapting in shape or form.
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 2 shows the true stress--strain curves of BT25y alloy at different strain rates and deformation temperatures.
This result, as compared to the plastic strain of the reference divider (22 mm), lead to the achievement of a 60% decrease in deformation (Fig.
The entire deformation of the CM up to the point where its destruction observed is accompanied the ruptures of the filaments.
This makes this type of deformation even more dangerous, the more that securing objects against such damages is very difficult in practice, if not impossible.
An example of deformation at the temperature of 800[degrees]C is presented.
For the deep drawing process with the reduction of the wall thickness, the specific deformation stress of the shape change is calculated by the expression:
When drawing up the warning indicator for downstream deformation, the maximum and minimum control values of the indicator can be determined when the significance level is a; thus, indicating that the nondeterministic optimal control has been achieved.
are used to identify AE sources and explain the dynamic evolution of deformation and fracture behaviors in materials.
In elastic deformation, the rotation matrix represents rigid body rotation of the material, which does not involve length change.
After 1, 3, 6, 10, 24, 34 and 48 hours of drying time two samples of each laboratory drying oven were selected and removed to measure deformation (figure 1) and to determine checking and moisture distribution (figure 3).
Bolibruch gave examples of such deformations and obtained a general form of the isomonodromic deformation.
Deformation under creep conditions, as well as increasing with time, load (stress) and temperature, is reduced by increasing the level of crystallinity, by the addition of fillers and by introducing crosslinking.