deforming

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de·form·ing

(dĕ-fōrm'ing),
Causing a deviation from the normal form.
References in classic literature ?
But a housemaid out of a reformatory, with a plain face and a deformed shoulder, falling in love, at first sight, with a gentleman who comes on a visit to her mistress's house, match me that, in the way of an absurdity, out of any story-book in Christendom, if you can!
A great mountain of deformed flesh clothed in dirty, white cotton pajamas!
The nose was but a gaping orifice above a deformed and twisted mouth.
She was ugly and uncouth, and because he was deformed there was between them a certain sympathy.
'Take care, ma'am,' I heard the maid say; 'that horrid deformed monster is as sly as a fox.
The last I saw of him he was pouring out that glorious flood of words--his deformed body, poised on the overthrown chair, his face lifted in rapture to some fantastic heaven of his own making.
It would have been much clearer if the lawyer's son had not been deformed, for then Tom would have had the prospect of pitching into him with all that freedom which is derived from a high moral sanction.
"I still don't know what the suspect used to deform the face of the woman.
In section 2, given a positive integer n and a fiber-preserving map f : M [right arrow] M, in a fiber bundle with base circle and fiber torus, we present necessary and sufficient conditions to deform [f.sup.n] : M [right arrow] M to a fixed point free map over [S.sup.1], see Theorem 2.3.
For many scientific applications such as Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) simulations and biomedical applications, geometric domains (i.e., domain boundaries) deform as time varies.
In the case of an actual blood vessel, the intima and the adventitia will not equally deform because of the material properties of the blood vessel wall.
Given the strength of Earth's gravity, Mount Everest is about as high as any deviation from equilibrium can get before rocks deform and the deviation sinks under its own weight faster than mountain-building forces can push it up.