deferoxamine


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deferoxamine

 [de″fer-oks´ah-mēn]
an iron-chelating agent isolated from Streptomyces pilosus, used as an antidote in iron poisoning.

deferoxamine

/de·fer·ox·amine/ (dĕ″fer-oks´ah-mēn) an iron-chelating agent isolated from Streptomyces pilosus; used as the mesylate salt as an antidote in iron poisoning.

deferoxamine

Deferoxamine mesylate Hematology A trihydroxamic acid produced by Streptomyces pilosus that ↑ urinary iron excretion; it is the only FDA-approved iron-chelating agent for clinical use; early use of deferoxamine in thalassemia major ↓ transfusion-related iron overload and protects against DM, cardiac disease, early death. See Hemochromatosis.

deferoxamine

A chelating agent used to treat iron compound poisoning. The drug is on the WHO official list.

deferoxamine, desferrioxamine

an iron chelating compound used as the mesylate to treat iron poisoning.
References in periodicals archive ?
Efficacy of deferoxamine in animal models of intracerebral hemorrhage: a systematic review and stratified meta-analysis," PLoS ONE, vol.
Comparison of deferoxamine pharmacokinetics between asymptomatic thalassemie children and those exhibiting severe neurotoxicity.
Using the iron-depleting agents, deferoxamine and ferrostatin-1, the cytotoxic activity was diminished, which is another proof for ferroptosis as relevant cell death mode of artemisinin compounds.
Randomized phase II trial of deferasirox (Exjade, ICL670), a once-daily, orally-administered iron chelator, in comparision to deferoxamine in thalassemia patients with transfusional iron overload.
Deferoxamine and deferiprone both iron chelators are used now a days but they are very expensive and difficult to use and have many side effects.
Medical standard: Iron-removal is accomplished by weekly phlebotomy of 1-2 units (250-500 mL of blood, each of which removes 250 mg of iron), and deferoxamine chelation is used in patients who cannot tolerate phlebotomy.
The use of deferoxamine therapy is limited by cost as well as the need for parenteral therapy, discomfort, inconvenience, and neurotoxicity.
Visual and auditory neurotoxicity in patients receiving subcutaneous deferoxamine infusions.
There are six agents available to treat heavy metal (arsenic, gold, iron, lead, and mercury) intoxication: de-ferasirox (iron), deferoxamine (iron), dimercaprol (arsenic, gold, lead, and mercury), edetate calcium disodium (lead), penicillamine (copper and mercury), and succimer (lead).
Reversal of cardiac complications by deferiprone and deferoxamine combination therapy in a patient affected by a severe type of juvenile haemochromatosis (JH).
Patients with thalassemia intermedia were started on DFX if they refused deferoxamine (DFO) or they were on hydroxyurea.