deferoxamine


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deferoxamine

 [de″fer-oks´ah-mēn]
an iron-chelating agent isolated from Streptomyces pilosus, used as an antidote in iron poisoning.

deferoxamine

/de·fer·ox·amine/ (dĕ″fer-oks´ah-mēn) an iron-chelating agent isolated from Streptomyces pilosus; used as the mesylate salt as an antidote in iron poisoning.

deferoxamine

Deferoxamine mesylate Hematology A trihydroxamic acid produced by Streptomyces pilosus that ↑ urinary iron excretion; it is the only FDA-approved iron-chelating agent for clinical use; early use of deferoxamine in thalassemia major ↓ transfusion-related iron overload and protects against DM, cardiac disease, early death. See Hemochromatosis.

deferoxamine

A chelating agent used to treat iron compound poisoning. The drug is on the WHO official list.

deferoxamine, desferrioxamine

an iron chelating compound used as the mesylate to treat iron poisoning.
References in periodicals archive ?
The patient underwent gastric lavage with normal saline and was started on intravenous deferoxamine therapy at 10 mg/kg per hour for a total of 6,000 mg.
Deferoxamine is currently given in the form of an injection and can have side effects ranging from mild stomach upset to, in rare cases, susceptibility to serious bacterial infection.
During the core phases of the registration trials, the discontinuation rate was about 10% in the deferasirox patients, and 6% in the deferoxamine crossover patients.
Key words: iron storage disease, deferoxamine, phlebotomy, inositol, tannic acid, diet, avian, birds, European starling, Sturnus vulgaris
Teva's Deferoxamine Mesylate for Injection is the AP-rated generic equivalent of Novartis' Desferal(R) for Injection, a product indicated for acute treatment of iron intoxication and chronic iron overload due to transfusion-dependent anemias.
Treatment with recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEPO) decreased the transfusion need, and intravenous deferoxamine resulted in a marked decreased in serum ferritin levels and normalization of liver function.
This is the first alternative to deferoxamine (DFO), which is administered via a subcutaneous infusion, usually in the abdomen for 8-12 hours overnight five to seven times a week.
Lowering absorption or brain tissue concentrations of aluminum also offers possible therapeutic opportunities for slowing the rate of clinical progression of the disease using deferoxamine, aluminum chelating agent (McLachlan et al.
Fatal Rhizopus infections in hemodialysis patients receiving deferoxamine.
Ampel NM, Bejerano GC, Saavedra M Jr: Deferoxamine increases the susceptibility of [beta]-thalassemic iron overload mice to infection with Listeria monocytogenes.
Combinations of the iron chelator, deferoxamine, with gallium or antibodies against ferrated transferrin receptors increase effectiveness against [ILLEGIBLE TEXT] cells.