defect

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Related to defects: latent defects

defect

 [de´fekt]
an imperfection, failure, or absence.
congenital heart defect see congenital heart defect.
aortic septal defect see aortic septal defect.
atrial septal defect see atrial septal defect.
filling defect an interruption in the contour of the inner surface of stomach or intestine revealed by radiography, indicating excess tissue or substance on or in the wall of the organ.
neural tube defect see neural tube defect.
septal defect a defect in the cardiac septum resulting in an abnormal communication between opposite chambers of the heart. Common types are aortic septal defect, atrial septal defect, and ventricular septal defect. See also congenital heart defect.

de·fect

(dē'fekt), Negative or pejorative connotations of this word may render it offensive in some contexts.
An imperfection, malformation, dysfunction, or absence; an attribute of quality, in contrast with deficiency, which is an attribute of quantity.
[L. deficio, pp. -fectus, to fail, to lack]

defect

Medtalk A malformation or abnormality. See Acquired platelet function defect, Atrial septal defect, Atrioventricular conduction defect, Birth defect, Developmental field defect, Enzyme defect, Epigenetic defect, Fibrous cortical defect, Filling defect, Homonymous field defect, Mass defect, Neural tube defect, Slot defect, Ventricular septal defect.

de·fect

(dē'fekt)
An imperfection, anomaly, malformation, dysfunction, or absence; a qualitative departure from what is expected. usage note Often confused with deficiency, which is a quantitative shortcoming.
[L. deficio, pp. -fectus, to fail, to lack]

de·fect

(dē'fekt)
An imperfection, malformation, dysfunction, or absence; an attribute of quality, in contrast with deficiency, which is an attribute of quantity.
[L. deficio, pp. -fectus, to fail, to lack]

Patient discussion about defect

Q. Is it a birth defect in children? I know about the causes of autism. Is it a birth defect in children?

A. it's not an easy answer i'm afraid...there are congenital differences, but no "birth defect" that we can detect. there's a good pdf file that gives a full explanation about it...i think you'll find it useful:
http://209.85.129.132/search?q=cache:U7PHTfTAZhYJ:www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autism_overview_2005.pdf+http://www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autism_overview_2005.pdf&hl=iw&ct=clnk&cd=1&gl=il

Q. why does ADHD make kind of an hype to children? is it a nerve defect?

A. it's a complex interaction among genetic and environmental factors causing a disorder in the central nervous system. a study showed a delay in development of certain brain structures n the frontal cortex and temporal lobe, which are believed to be responsible for the ability to control and focus thinking.

More discussions about defect
References in periodicals archive ?
'While 25 defects for the highway is between 223 days to 461 days.
"Congenital heart defects in offspring may be an early marker of predisposition to cardiovascular disease," the authors write.
The results of this initial fixation study demonstrate that rTSA glenoid baseplate stability can be achieved with the tested baseplate design in scapula with 8.5 mm (31% of width) anterior glenoid defects and that stability may become problematic as anterior glenoid defect sizes approach 12.5 mm (46% of width).
If it is effective in isolating defects, it could alleviate buyers' concerns of purchasing coffee in these regions.
Cragan and her coauthors retrospectively examined data on birth defects in three regions of the country: Massachusetts during 2013, North Carolina during 2013, and Atlanta during 2013-2014.
Infants or fetuses with birth defects were aggregated into four mutually exclusive categories of defects characterized by CDC subject matter experts as being consistent with those observed with congenital Zika virus infection: 1) brain abnormalities or microcephaly (head circumference at delivery <3rd percentile for sex and gestational age) (5); 2) neural tube defects and other early brain malformations; 3) eye abnormalities without mention of a brain abnormality included in the first two categories; and 4) other consequences of CNS dysfunction, specifically joint contractures and congenital sensorineural deafness, without mention of brain or eye abnormalities included in another category.
A prospective study was conducted on patients with oral defects covered by Buccal fat pad between July 2008 and January 2016 in department of oral and maxillofacial surgery of Khyber College of Dentistry Peshawar.
Furthermore, these taxonomies have a direct impact on how lenders create an action plan to address those defects once they are uncovered and appropriately classified.