defective

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defective

 [de-fek´tiv]
1. imperfect.
2. a person lacking in some physical, mental, or moral quality.

de·fec·tive

(dĕ-fek'tiv), Negative or pejorative connotations of this word may render it offensive in some contexts.
Denoting or exhibiting a defect; imperfect; a failure of quality.

de·fec·tive

(dĕ-fek'tiv)
Denoting or exhibiting a defect; imperfect; a failure of quality.

de·fec·tive

(dĕ-fek'tiv)
Denoting or exhibiting a defect; imperfect; a failure of quality.

Patient discussion about defective

Q. Is it a birth defect in children? I know about the causes of autism. Is it a birth defect in children?

A. it's not an easy answer i'm afraid...there are congenital differences, but no "birth defect" that we can detect. there's a good pdf file that gives a full explanation about it...i think you'll find it useful:
http://209.85.129.132/search?q=cache:U7PHTfTAZhYJ:www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autism_overview_2005.pdf+http://www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autism_overview_2005.pdf&hl=iw&ct=clnk&cd=1&gl=il

Q. why does ADHD make kind of an hype to children? is it a nerve defect?

A. it's a complex interaction among genetic and environmental factors causing a disorder in the central nervous system. a study showed a delay in development of certain brain structures n the frontal cortex and temporal lobe, which are believed to be responsible for the ability to control and focus thinking.

More discussions about defective
References in classic literature ?
We had identified the unhappy woman whom I had met in the night-time with Anne Catherick--we had made some advance, at least, towards connecting the probably defective condition of the poor creature's intellect with the peculiarity of her being dressed all in white, and with the continuance, in her maturer years, of her childish gratitude towards Mrs.
Sylvie was gentle in manners, intelligent in mind; she was even sincere, as far as her religion would permit her to be so, but her physical organization was defective; weak health stunted her growth and chilled her spirits, and then, destined as she was for the cloister, her whole soul was warped to a conventual bias, and in the tame, trained subjection of her manner, one read that she had already prepared herself for her future course of life, by giving up her independence of thought and action into the hands of some despotic confessor.
The learning of this people is very defective, consisting only in morality, history, poetry, and mathematics, wherein they must be allowed to excel.