defect


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defect

 [de´fekt]
an imperfection, failure, or absence.
congenital heart defect see congenital heart defect.
aortic septal defect see aortic septal defect.
atrial septal defect see atrial septal defect.
filling defect an interruption in the contour of the inner surface of stomach or intestine revealed by radiography, indicating excess tissue or substance on or in the wall of the organ.
neural tube defect see neural tube defect.
septal defect a defect in the cardiac septum resulting in an abnormal communication between opposite chambers of the heart. Common types are aortic septal defect, atrial septal defect, and ventricular septal defect. See also congenital heart defect.

de·fect

(dē'fekt), Negative or pejorative connotations of this word may render it offensive in some contexts.
An imperfection, malformation, dysfunction, or absence; an attribute of quality, in contrast with deficiency, which is an attribute of quantity.
[L. deficio, pp. -fectus, to fail, to lack]

defect

/de·fect/ (de´fekt) an imperfection, failure, or absence.defec´tive
acquired defect  a non-genetic imperfection arising secondarily, after birth.
aortic septal defect  a congenital anomaly in which there is abnormal communication between the ascending aorta and pulmonary artery just above the semilunar valves.
atrial septal defects , atrioseptal defects congenital anomalies in which there is persistent patency of the atrial septum, owing to failure of the ostium primum or ostium secundum.
Enlarge picture
Atrial septal defects; cutaway composite view showing possible locations of ostium primum and secundum defects in the right atrium.
birth defect  one present at birth, whether a morphological defect (dysmorphism) or an inborn error of metabolism.
congenital defect  birth d.
congenital ectodermal defect  anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.
cortical defect  a benign, symptomless, circumscribed rarefaction of cortical bone, detected radiographically.
endocardial cushion defects  a spectrum of septal defects resulting from imperfect fusion of the endocardial cushions, and ranging from persistent ostium primum to persistent common atrioventricular canal; see atrial septal d. and atrioventricularis communis.
fibrous cortical defect  a small, asymptomatic, osteolytic, fibrous lesion occurring within the bone cortex, particularly in the metaphyseal region of long bones in childhood.
filling defect  any localized defect in the contour of the stomach, duodenum, or intestine, as seen in the radiograph after a barium enema.
genetic defect  see under disease.
luteal phase defect  inadequate secretory transformation of the endometrium during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle; it can cause habitual abortion.
metaphyseal fibrous defect 
neural tube defect  a developmental anomaly of failure of closure of the neural tube, resulting in conditions such as anencephaly or spina bifida.
retention defect  a defect in the power of recalling or remembering names, numbers, or events.
septal defect  a defect in a cardiac septum resulting in an abnormal communication between the opposite chambers of the heart.
ventricular septal defect  a congenital cardiac anomaly in which there is persistent patency of the ventricular septum in either the muscular or fibrous portions, most often due to failure of the bulbar septum to completely close the interventricular foramen.
Enlarge picture
Abnormal communication between the ventricles in ventricular septal defect.

defect

Medtalk A malformation or abnormality. See Acquired platelet function defect, Atrial septal defect, Atrioventricular conduction defect, Birth defect, Developmental field defect, Enzyme defect, Epigenetic defect, Fibrous cortical defect, Filling defect, Homonymous field defect, Mass defect, Neural tube defect, Slot defect, Ventricular septal defect.

de·fect

(dē'fekt)
An imperfection, anomaly, malformation, dysfunction, or absence; a qualitative departure from what is expected. usage note Often confused with deficiency, which is a quantitative shortcoming.
[L. deficio, pp. -fectus, to fail, to lack]

defect,

n 1. congenital anomaly in structure or function that may or may not be life-threatening.
2. failure of a product to meet a reasonable expectation of performance and safety to the consumer.

de·fect

(dē'fekt)
An imperfection, malformation, dysfunction, or absence; an attribute of quality, in contrast with deficiency, which is an attribute of quantity.
[L. deficio, pp. -fectus, to fail, to lack]

defect,

n 1. the absence of some legal requisite.
2. an imperfection.
defect, atrial septal,
n a congenital defect in the heart that is often present from birth. It is sometimes referred to as a “hole” in the heart and is caused by the unsuccessful closure of the septum between the atria of the heart. The failure of the septum to close properly leaves a hole between the right and left atria.
defect, operative,
n the incomplete repair of bone after root resection or periapical curettage.
defect, osseous,
n a concavity in the bone surrounding one or more teeth, resulting from periodontal disease.
defect, speech,
n deviation of speech that is outside the range of acceptable variation in a given environment.

defect

an imperfection, failure or absence.

filling defect
an interruption in the contour of the inner surface of viscus revealed by contrast radiography, indicating excess tissue or substance on or in the wall of the organ, foreign body or other space-occupying lesions.
negative defect
in neurology, a movement that cannot be performed, such as in paresis or paralysis.
positive defect
in neurology, an involuntary movement, such as tremors, abnormal posture or seizures.
septal defect
a defect in the cardiac septum resulting in an abnormal communication between opposite chambers of the heart. See also aortic septal defect, atrial septal defect and ventricular septal defect.

Patient discussion about defect

Q. Is it a birth defect in children? I know about the causes of autism. Is it a birth defect in children?

A. it's not an easy answer i'm afraid...there are congenital differences, but no "birth defect" that we can detect. there's a good pdf file that gives a full explanation about it...i think you'll find it useful:
http://209.85.129.132/search?q=cache:U7PHTfTAZhYJ:www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autism_overview_2005.pdf+http://www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autism_overview_2005.pdf&hl=iw&ct=clnk&cd=1&gl=il

Q. why does ADHD make kind of an hype to children? is it a nerve defect?

A. it's a complex interaction among genetic and environmental factors causing a disorder in the central nervous system. a study showed a delay in development of certain brain structures n the frontal cortex and temporal lobe, which are believed to be responsible for the ability to control and focus thinking.

More discussions about defect
References in periodicals archive ?
NBDPN data provide a means for comparing statespecific prevalence estimates for each defect by state, racial/ ethnic population, type of surveillance, pregnancy outcomes included, and size of program; however, to date, national prevalence using these data has been estimated only for neural tube defects (4).
This oxide defect also explains the lack of success using visual and/or x-ray testing.
In 1974, Karapandzic first described the use of a myocutaneous flap to close defects that involve more than half the lip surface area.
For World Birth Defects Day 2017, the same group of partners has reconvened and invited others to join them to continue to bring attention to this global public health issue.
The X-Y offset defect was introduced for passive components only by designing the stencil to print up to 50% off the pad.
Radiesse is a long-lasting implant material that has been approved by the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of oral and maxillofacial defects, for vocal fold augmentation, for radiographic tissue marking, and for other indications that are under review.
Next, one of the particles in the defect region was isolated for spot mode analysis.
Intake of perchlorate from a contaminated source may cause discharge of iodide from the thyrocyte, further exacerbating the organification defect, with resulting decrease of TH synthesis.
However, films of interest are seldom perfectly uniform, and meas-ured line width reflects both the damping and the defects in the sample.
However, to realize the power of online inspection for serious process and product improvement, a web inspection system should be able to go beyond simple defect detection and address at least these additional areas: multiple detection algorithms, defect classification, repeating defect analysis and formation or uniformity analysis.
Defective sectors replaced by the slipping algorithm are listed in the Primary Defect List (PDL), which is recorded in the Defect Management Area (DMA) on the DVD-RAM media during formatting.