deep fascia


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fascia

 [fash´e-ah] (pl. fas´ciae) (L.)
a sheet or band of fibrous tissue such as lies deep to the skin or invests muscles and various body organs. adj., adj fas´cial.
Organization and connective tissue components of skeletal muscle. From Applegate, 2000.
aponeurotic fascia a dense, firm, fibrous membrane investing the trunk and limbs and giving off sheaths to the various muscles.
fascia cribro´sa the superficial fascia of the thigh covering the saphenous opening (fossa ovalis femoris).
crural fascia the investing fascia of the lower limb.
deep fascia aponeurotic fascia.
endothoracic fascia that beneath the serous lining of the thoracic cavity.
fascia la´ta the external investing fascia of the thigh.
Scarpa's fascia the deep, membranous layer of the subcutaneous abdominal fascia.
superficial fascia
1. a fascial sheet lying directly beneath the skin.
thyrolaryngeal fascia the fascia covering the thyroid gland and attached to the cricoid cartilage.
transverse fascia that between the transversalis muscle and the peritoneum.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

deep fas·ci·a

a fibrous membrane of variable thickness, devoid of fat, which invests the muscles, separating the several groups and the individual muscles, forms sheaths for the nerves and vessels, becomes specialized around the joints to form or strengthen ligaments, envelops various organs and glands, and binds all the structures together into a firm compact mass. Terminologia Anatomica [TA] has recommended that the terms "superficial fascia" and "deep fascia" not be used generically or in an unqualified way because of variation in their meanings internationally. The recommended terms are "subcutaneous tissue [TA] (tela subcutanea)" for the former superficial fascia, and "muscular fascia", "parietal fascia", or "visceral fascia" (fascia musculorum, fascia parietal[is], or fascia visceral[is]) in place of deep fascia.
Synonym(s): fascia profunda
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

deep fa·scia

(dēp fash'ē-ă)
A thin fibrous membrane, devoid of fat, which invests the muscles, separating the several groups and the individual muscles, forms sheaths for the nerves and vessels, becomes specialized around the joints to form or strengthen ligaments, envelops various organs and glands, and binds all the structures together into a firm compact mass.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The deep fascia of the foot is thin on the dorsum of the foot where it is continuous with the inferior extensor retinaculum.
For example, subcutaneous tissue can slide over deep fascia, and muscles can slide because of an interface between the deep fascia and epimysium [8].
Effect of adenosine on rat superficial and deep fascia and the effect of heparin on the contractile responses.
(6) revealed the following: (i) the superior gluteal region is supplied by 5 [+ or -] 2 cutaneous perforators arising from the superior gluteal artery; (ii) all perforators are musculocutaneous, with 50% passing through the gluteus maximus muscle while the remaining 50% pass through the gluteus medius muscle; (iii) the average diameter of the perforators arising from the superior gluteal artery is 0.6 [+ or -] 0.1 mm and the average pedicle length from the deep fascia is 23 [+ or -] 11 mm; and (iv) the average cutaneous vascular territory for the superior gluteal artery is 69 [+ or -] 56 [cm.sup.2] with each perforator supplying an area of 21 [+ or -] 8 [cm.sup.2].
Blood from the tissues superficial to the deep fascia returns via the long and short saphenous veins.
Scanning can confirm that the local anaesthetic has spread to contact the deep fascia on each side A subcutaneous wheel of local anaesthetic along the penoscrotal junction completes the block.
Consequently the site of the midbelly trigger point (Chaitow and Walker DeLany 2002, Travell and Simons 1999) is buried deep beneath skin, subcutaneous tissue, deep fascia, the gastrocnemius muscle and the overlying dense fascia of the popliteus muscle (Figure 5).
The deep fascia is new, as are the centre console and instrumentation, while there are satisfying amendments to the switchgear.
Understated black trim with deep fascia to a rather large Californian-style rear end, this is pretty car which will look so at home on the harbourside at Puerto Banus.
Seats were deeply shaped and comfortable with reasonably good adjustment, although a short driver complained about the deep fascia hitting knees if the seat was close to the steering column.
As a result of dissections in cadavers and biopsies, Copeman and Ackerman[3] indicated that these nodules were the result of herniations of fatty tissue through the neurovascular foramina from the deep fascia into the superficial fascia.