deduction

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deduction

 [de-duk´shun]
reasoning in which the conclusion follows necessarily from the premises; reasoning from the general to the particular.

de·duc·tion

(dē-dŭk'shŭn),
The logical derivation of a conclusion from certain premises. The conclusion will be true if the premises are true and the deductive argument is valid. Compare: induction (9).

deduction

Etymology: L, deducere, to lead
a system of reasoning that leads from a known principle to an unknown, or from the general to the specific. Deductive reasoning is used to test diagnostic hypotheses.

de·duc·tion

(dĕ-dŭk'shŭn)
The logical derivation of a conclusion based on certain premises. The conclusion will be true if the premises are true and the deductive argument is valid.
Compare: induction (9)
References in periodicals archive ?
Section 461(h) is consistent with generally accepted accounting principles as it relates to the proper deducting of the California Franchise Tax (and other taxes) and represents current legislative thinking as to the timing of the deduction for such taxes.
Deducting home office expenses will still increase the probability of an IRS audit.
Those who can will find the standards for deducting such expenses have reached a new level of confusion.
404(d) timing requirements; thus, Clarkston failed to meet the economic performance prong of the all-events test, thereby preventing the Weavers from deducting the expenses in the years claimed.
Taxpayers who otherwise meet the requirements for deducting points as interest may file amended returns for 1991, 1992 and 1993 to elect the new procedure.
163(h)(3)(B)(ii) and (C)(i) bar taxpayers from deducting excess interest payments.
However, until the IRS provides further guidance, taxpayers still should consider deducting points paid on loans to improve a principal residence since the tax code permits a current deduction for interest on such loans.
The possibility of the firms obtaining sizable tax benefits from deducting the payments raised a political outcry and prompted proposed legislation to expand the definition of nondeductible fines or penalties.