dedifferentiation


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anaplasia

 [an″ah-pla´zhah]
loss of differentiation of cells and their orientation to each other, a characteristic of tumor cells; called also dedifferentiation and undifferentiation.

de·dif·fer·en·ti·a·tion

(dē-dif'ĕr-en'shē-ā'shŭn),
1. The return of parts to a more homogeneous state.
2. Synonym(s): anaplasia

dedifferentiation

/de·dif·fer·en·ti·a·tion/ (de-dif″er-en″she-a´shun) anaplasia.

dedifferentiation

(dē′dĭf-ə-rĕn′shē-ā′shən)
n. Biology
Reversion of a specialized cell or tissue to an unspecialized form. Dedifferentiation may occur before the regeneration of appendages in plants and certain animals and in the development of some cancers.

de′dif·fer·en′ti·ate′ v.

dedifferentiation

See anaplasia.

dedifferentiation

Pathology
The reversion of a cell or cell line to a more embryonic form.
 
Tumour biology
The loss of the cellular features of terminal differentiation, a finding often associated with increased aggressiveness of a neoplasm.

de·dif·fer·en·ti·a·tion

(dē-dif'ĕr-en'shē-ā'shŭn)
1. The return of parts to a more homogeneous state.
2. Synonym(s): anaplasia.

dedifferentiation

a process in which tissues that have undergone CELL DIFFERENTIATION can be made to reverse the process so as to become a primordial cell again (see GURDON). In theory, all cells should possess this ability since the mature cell does not lose DNA (see TOTIPOTENCY), but reversal has been demonstrated in plants much more easily than in animal cells.

dedifferentiation

regression from a more specialized or complex form to a simpler state.
References in periodicals archive ?
Distant metastasis in retroperitoneal dedifferentiated liposarcoma is rare and rapidly fatal: a clinicopathological study with emphasis on the low grade myxofibrosarcoma-like pattern as an early sign of dedifferentiation.
Nerve injury leads to the dedifferentiation of Schwann cells from myelinated cells to immature undeveloped cells [15] and, as discussed in Section 5.
It is with this latter realization that the dedifferentiation problem kicks in.
A possible tumor necrosis factor-alpha-mediated dedifferentiation of adipocytes.
Dedifferentiation may occur spontaneously or be related to surgical procedures that become necessary due to recurrences of the primary tumor or therapeutic radiation.
Quantitative expression of Oct-3/4 defines differentiation, dedifferentiation or self-renewal of ES cells.
Alternatively, it is possible that transformation of more differentiated cells leads to more differentiated tumors that may thereafter evolve, via dedifferentiation processes, to stemlike phenotypic states.
Through a dedifferentiation technique, the stem cells were grown in a controlled environment to be forced to synthesize secondary metabolites as a defense reaction to a controlled stress, according to Claire-Marie Grizaud.
For indirect somatic embryogenesis, dedifferentiation occurs from the explants and consequently leads to callus formation.
TDZ is a highly effective regulator of in vitro morphogenesis and can induce differentiation and dedifferentiation in woody species (24), and contributes to rejuvenation of adult material among various forest species by inducing adventitious bud on organs such as leaves and internodes (25).
leprae interacts with ErbB2 receptors on the surface of myelinating Schwann cells and causes myelinated Schwann cells to dedifferentiation into an unmyelinated cell via an internal signaling process.
The final stage is characterized by dense sclerosis and further thickening of the involved bone, often obliterating the previously thickened trabecular pattern, or so-called corticotrabecullar dedifferentiation.