dedifferentiation


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

anaplasia

 [an″ah-pla´zhah]
loss of differentiation of cells and their orientation to each other, a characteristic of tumor cells; called also dedifferentiation and undifferentiation.

de·dif·fer·en·ti·a·tion

(dē-dif'ĕr-en'shē-ā'shŭn),
1. The return of parts to a more homogeneous state.
2. Synonym(s): anaplasia

dedifferentiation

(dē′dĭf-ə-rĕn′shē-ā′shən)
n. Biology
Reversion of a specialized cell or tissue to an unspecialized form. Dedifferentiation may occur before the regeneration of appendages in plants and certain animals and in the development of some cancers.

de′dif·fer·en′ti·ate′ v.

dedifferentiation

Pathology
The reversion of a cell or cell line to a more embryonic form.
 
Tumour biology
The loss of the cellular features of terminal differentiation, a finding often associated with increased aggressiveness of a neoplasm.

de·dif·fer·en·ti·a·tion

(dē-dif'ĕr-en'shē-ā'shŭn)
1. The return of parts to a more homogeneous state.
2. Synonym(s): anaplasia.

dedifferentiation

a process in which tissues that have undergone CELL DIFFERENTIATION can be made to reverse the process so as to become a primordial cell again (see GURDON). In theory, all cells should possess this ability since the mature cell does not lose DNA (see TOTIPOTENCY), but reversal has been demonstrated in plants much more easily than in animal cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
We propose that these results provide a proof of concept for epigenetics-driven cancer development, and suggest that particular types of cancer, such as Wilms' tumor, might arise mainly as a result of dedifferentiation disrupting epigenetic regulation (Fig.
Impairment of cell cycle control Replicative senescence Accumulated mutations Dedifferentiation Lack of Contact inhibition Formation of blood vessel network Invasiveness Metastasis Table 2: Specific CSC markers and function [adapted from [25]].
In the present study, WDTC undergoing dedifferentiation was defined as primary WDTC with dedifferentiated components at primary or metastatic sites.
Seidler, "Evidence for motor cortex dedifferentiation in older adults," Neurobiology of Aging, vol.
Louis, MO, catalog number C-1768; 10 [micro]M for 24 h.) to reduce proliferating cells and to minimize fiber dedifferentiation [30, 33].
However, some issues remain unresolved, such as the dedifferentiation which occurs in cultured chondrocytes in vitro.
The term dedifferentiation was first coined by Dahlin and Beabout [13] in their description of a peculiar clinicopathological entity of a chondrosarcoma [13], which was later established in salivary gland neoplasms [4].
A mechanism of "dedifferentiation" of lymphoma cells into more immature stages as a result of secondary genetic events has been suggested in our case.
Additionally, spindle or tubular predominance and low to high grades including sarcomatoid dedifferentiation can be observed with impact on the aggressiveness of the clinical course [2,3].
Stem cell activation and scarless wound healing are considered to be essential requisites for quality tissue regeneration [16-18]; however, for some regenerative processes a dedifferentiation process, but not stem cell activation, is required [19].
In previous studies, we have shown that the dedifferentiation process is relatively independent of the fat depot, obesity level, sex, or age of the cell donor [2].
Furthermore, during dedifferentiation, or upon induction of pluripotency, mitochondrial morphology reverts to that of stem cells displaying immature spherical and cristae-poor structures [11, 12], and, in itself, promotion of glycolysis at the expense of oxidative phosphorylation promotes dedifferentiation [12].