decongestant


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Related to decongestant: antihistamine

decongestant

 [de″kon-jes´tant]
1. tending to reduce congestion or swelling, usually of the nasal membranes. Called also decongestive.
2. an agent that has this effect; it may be inhaled, taken as spray or nose drops, or used orally in liquid or tablet form. Nasal decongestants act by reducing swelling of the membranes and thus opening up the nasal passages. Among the leading ones are epinephrine, ephedrine, and phenylephrine. antihistamines may also be effective either alone or in combination with decongestants. A decongestant must be used several times a day to be helpful; but excessive use may cause headaches, dizziness, or other disorders and sometimes the medicine itself may cause reactive nasal swelling.

de·con·ges·tant

(dē'kon-jes'tant),
1. Synonym(s): decongestive
2. An agent that possesses this action.

decongestant

/de·con·ges·tant/ (de″kon-jes´tint)
1. tending to reduce congestion or swelling.
2. an agent that so acts.

decongestant

(dē′kən-jĕs′tənt)
n.
A medication or treatment that decreases congestion, as of the sinuses.
adj.
Capable of relieving congestion.

decongestant

Etymology: L, de + congerere, to pile up
1 adj, pertaining to a substance or procedure that eliminates or reduces congestion or swelling.
2 n, a decongestant drug. Adrenergic drugs (α-1 stimulants), such as ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, that cause vasoconstriction of nasal mucosa are used as decongestants.

decongestant

Pharmacology An agent that ↓ swelling or congestion–eg, nasal decongestants–eg pseudoephedrine, phenylpropanolamine, which constrict blood vessels, ↓ blood flow to nasal mucosa and sinuses and ↓ mucosal edema Adverse effects Insomnia, irritability; HTN, renal failure, arrhythmias, psychosis, strokes, seizures, rebound effect; used with caution in Pts with HTN, heart disease, seizure disorders, or hyperthyroidism, or in those receiving MAOIs. See Nasal decongestant, Rebound effect, Rhinitis medicamentosa, Steam decongestant.

de·con·ges·tant

(dē-kŏn-jes'tănt)
1. Having the property of reducing congestion.
2. An agent that reduces congestion.

decongestant

A drug or treatment that reduces the blood flow through, and swelling of, mucous membranes, especially those lining the nose and sinuses.

Decongestant

Medicines that shrink blood vessels and consequently mucus membranes. Pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, and phenylpropanolamine are the most common.
Mentioned in: Nasal Polyps

decongestant,

n a substance that reduces the production of mucus, thus relieving sinus congestion.

decongestant

1. tending to reduce congestion or swelling.
2. an agent that reduces congestion or swelling, usually of the nasal membranes. Decongestants may be inhaled, administered as spray or nose drops, or used orally in liquid or tablet form. The medication acts by reducing swelling of the nasal membranes and thus opening up the nasal passages. Among the leading medications used as decongestants are epinephrine, ephedrine and phenylephrine. Antihistamines, alone or in combination with decongestants, may also be effective.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rehan adds, "Make sure you throw out every nasal spray decongestant you have, or you won't be able to stop using it.
That's the situation with using antihistamines and decongestants in treating otitis media with effusion.
Griffin and his associates studied 15 randomized, controlled trials of 1,516 children with OME that compared antihistamines, decongestants, or a combination of the two and that appeared in the medical literature through March 2006.
Garay, the short-lived benefit of OTC decongestant sprays may create a pattern of overuse and dependence for the user that could result in chronic nasal obstruction.
Decongestants and menthol both help to reduce the swelling in the nose and allow the sinuses to drain.
Antihistamines are often combined with a decongestant to relieve nasal pressure.
Federal prosecutors obtained a first-in-the-nation judgment in April against a California convenience store owner who bought large amounts of decongestants that could be used to make methamphetamine.
The decongestant rubs for babies often help, but check for any age restrictions before using them.
Over-the-counter and prescription decongestant nose drops and sprays, however, should not be used for more than a few days.
Decongestant (dee-con-JEST-ant) medicines can reduce the swelling.
The drug contained 44 milligrams of the decongestant ephedrine, 60 mg of caffeine, and 100 mg of theophylline, an asthma medication.