decondition


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decondition

(dē′kən-dĭsh′ən)
v. decondi·tioned, decondi·tioning, decondi·tions
v.tr.
1. Psychology To cause (a conditioned response) to become extinct.
2. To cause to decline from a condition of physical fitness, as through a prolonged period of inactivity or, in astronauts, through weightlessness in space.
v.intr.
To lose physical fitness.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Following these complications, he was severely deconditioned (critical illness myopathy was evident from day 9) and received a tracheostomy on day 16.
"When astronauts travel to Mars, they will arrive with deconditioned bodies, with limited access to medical support.
Rehabilitation intervention with deconditioned older adults following an acute hospital admission: a systematic review.
"He's deconditioned because he hasn't played a lot of football.
"But many of us have become deconditioned from sitting too much, and the result is less range of motion and more pain--all because we're not as physically active as we used to be or we can be."
(2) That is very good news for older bodies, especially the deconditioned ones.
"If you're overweight and deconditioned and you continue to put your joint through wear and tear and just take something for the pain, you're not putting that joint in a more favorable environment."
If Stand CE-V[O.sub.2] max was equivalent to TM-V[O.sub.2] max in OWAS, the Stand CE might be used to assess similar populations that are unlikely to be able to stand (e.g., diseased, deconditioned, balance/gait-impaired, etc.) throughout an entire CE-GXT or TM-GXT (50).
Young HD amputees with no serious underlying disease may recover from a deconditioned state relatively easily, giving them high probability of success in prosthetic walking [1-2,10-11].
He needs the rest, but when he returns he won't be too deconditioned because of the football he has had."
"Tai chi exercise, a multicomponent mind-body training modality that is safe and has good rates of adherence, may provide value in improving daily exercise, quality of life, self-efficacy, and mood in frail, deconditioned patients with systolic HF.
"Little, however, is known about the potential value of integrative mind-body movement therapies in this population." Tai chi is well suited for heart failure patients because the physical component "is low impact [and] nonstrenuous, and can easily be performed by the elderly or the more severely deconditioned patients," she said.