decompensation


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Related to decompensation: cardiac decompensation

decompensation

 [de″kom-pen-sa´shun]
1. any failure of homeostatic mechanisms.
2. inability of the heart to maintain adequate circulation; it is marked by dyspnea, venous engorgement, cyanosis, and edema.
3. in psychiatry, the failure of defense mechanisms, which results in progressive personality disintegration.

de·com·pen·sa·tion

(dē'kom-pen-sā'shŭn), Avoid substituting this word for deterioration or failure in cases where there has been no previous compensation.
1. A failure of compensation in heart disease.
2. The appearance or exacerbation of a mental disorder due to failure of defense mechanisms.

decompensation

/de·com·pen·sa·tion/ (de″kom-pen-sa´shun)
1. inability of the heart to maintain adequate circulation, marked by dyspnea, venous engorgement, and edema.
2. in psychiatry, failure of defense mechanisms resulting in progressive personality disintegration.

decompensation

(dē′kŏm-pən-sā′shən)
n.
1. Medicine The inability of a bodily organ or system, especially the circulatory system, to maintain adequate physiological function in the presence of disease.
2. Psychology The inability to maintain defense mechanisms in response to stress, resulting in personality disturbance or psychological imbalance.

de·com′pen·sate′ v.

decompensation

[dē′kəmpənsā′shən]
Etymology: L, de + compensare, to balance
1 the failure of a system, as cardiac decompensation in heart failure.
2 (in psychology) the failure of a defense mechanism.

decompensation

Medtalk An acute exacerbation or worsening of a clinical condition–eg schizophrenia, renal failure, liver failure, which had been held in check by compensatory mechanisms Psychiatry The exacerbation of a mental condition–eg schizophrenia, that occurs when corrective mechanisms cannot maintain the individual at an optimal level of functioning; the deterioration of existing defenses, leading to an exacerbation of pathologic behavior. See Nervous breakdown.

de·com·pen·sa·tion

(dē-kom'pĕn-sā'shŭn)
1. A failure of compensation in heart disease.
2. The appearance or exacerbation of a mental disorder due to failure of defense mechanisms.

decompensation (dē·kmˈ·pen·sāˑ·shn),

n 1. a persistent (yet reversible, in some cases) pattern of dysfunction, in which homeostatic mechanisms are overwhelmed, either in part or completely.
2. postural pattern in which the musculoskeletal system indicates dysfunctional ad-justments as a result of a physical anomaly, such as shortened leg.

decompensation

Failure of an organ to fulfill its function adequately. Examples: corneal decompensation following years of extended contact lens wear; a failure of the eye movement system to overcome a heterophoria.

decompensation

failure of compensation.

cardiac decompensation
inability of the heart to maintain adequate circulation; it is marked by dyspnea, venous engorgement, cyanosis and edema.
References in periodicals archive ?
The study results revealed no statistically significant difference in respiratory decompensation between patients with and without BPD.
3) the most common indication for IOL removal was corneal decompensation (38%).
The Main advantage for the Vision is the Uncorrected Visual Acuity which has improved for every body except one who had Corneal Decompensation and Corneal surgery is being planned for.
Eight months after onset of the patient's condition, marked hepatic decompensation occurred (online Technical Appendix Figure), culminating in esophageal variceal hemorrhage.
is being managed as a case of advanced liver cancer with signs of decompensation, for humanitarian reasons, the Court is inclined to allow accused to visit his father at the NKTI on July 2, the court added.
Delivered through a catheter requiring only a small hole in the leg, the Impelia RP is FDA indicated for providing circulatory assistance for up to 14 days in pediatric or adult patients who develop acute right heart failure or decompensation following left ventricular assist device implantation, myocardial infarction, heart transplant, or openheart surgery.
Being followed for a period of 3 months 25% patients were readmitted to hospital with heart failure decompensation.
The cirrhosis can develop in the form of the compensated stage with minimum clinical-biological changes or as decompensated cirrhosis, when specific changes for parenchymatous and vascular decompensation are present.
This inflammatory process contributed at increas- ing the resistance in pulmonary arterial circulation and the pulmonary hypertension with right heart decompensation.
The registry captures data across the country from heart failure patients presenting with acute decompensation.
According to the study, 62 percent of the patients had improvements in clinical conditions associated with hepatic decompensation and/or improvement in liver function tests.
Emergency medicine, critical care, surgery, and other physicians mainly from the US supply 67 chapters on the resuscitation and critical care of patients in the emergency department, from the initial steps in stabilization to the management of further decompensation.