decompensation


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Related to decompensation: cardiac decompensation

decompensation

 [de″kom-pen-sa´shun]
1. any failure of homeostatic mechanisms.
2. inability of the heart to maintain adequate circulation; it is marked by dyspnea, venous engorgement, cyanosis, and edema.
3. in psychiatry, the failure of defense mechanisms, which results in progressive personality disintegration.

de·com·pen·sa·tion

(dē'kom-pen-sā'shŭn), Avoid substituting this word for deterioration or failure in cases where there has been no previous compensation.
1. A failure of compensation in heart disease.
2. The appearance or exacerbation of a mental disorder due to failure of defense mechanisms.

decompensation

(dē′kŏm-pən-sā′shən)
n.
1. Medicine The inability of a bodily organ or system, especially the circulatory system, to maintain adequate physiological function in the presence of disease.
2. Psychology The inability to maintain defense mechanisms in response to stress, resulting in personality disturbance or psychological imbalance.

de·com′pen·sate′ v.

decompensation

Medtalk An acute exacerbation or worsening of a clinical condition–eg schizophrenia, renal failure, liver failure, which had been held in check by compensatory mechanisms Psychiatry The exacerbation of a mental condition–eg schizophrenia, that occurs when corrective mechanisms cannot maintain the individual at an optimal level of functioning; the deterioration of existing defenses, leading to an exacerbation of pathologic behavior. See Nervous breakdown.

de·com·pen·sa·tion

(dē-kom'pĕn-sā'shŭn)
1. A failure of compensation in heart disease.
2. The appearance or exacerbation of a mental disorder due to failure of defense mechanisms.

decompensation

Failure of an organ to fulfill its function adequately. Examples: corneal decompensation following years of extended contact lens wear; a failure of the eye movement system to overcome a heterophoria.
References in periodicals archive ?
data of three patients was withdrawn as the was lack of adherence to protocol while for those still enrolled (225 patients) a 3 months data was observed for mortality and readmissions for decompensation of heart failure (Algorithm).
In the current study, secondary corneal decompensation was the primary reason for not replacing the explanted IOL, and was also the second most common indication for IOL removal.
The incidence of respiratory decompensation and cardiorespiratory events (apnea, bradycardia, desaturations) after immunization was compared between infants with and without BPD after immunization (Pediatrics.
An HVPG above 5 mmHg defines portal hypertension, however an HVPG of 10 mmHg or greater points towards clinically significant portal hypertension as this pressure gradient predicts clinical course in patients with cirrhosis including development of varices15, clinical decompensation (i.e.
"It is critical to obtain this information as early as possible in the evaluation of the potential liver transplant recipient with an unknown etiology of liver disease or who presents with acute hepatic decompensation," they wrote.
* hesitation to relinquish a complex medication regimen because the patient fears decompensation (which could be either realistic or unrealistic)
When analyzing decompensation, the rate was 135 (114-160) per 1,000 person-years in those who had used statins for treatment.
In our unit, we conducted a retrospective cohort study including 106 patients (age 60.3[+ or -]10.7 years; 87.7% men) (admitted for acute decompensation of liver cirrhosis between January 2014 and December 2015.
Caption: Figure 6: Development of (further) hepatic decompensation according to gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI (GA-MRI) response to interferon-free treatment.
Table 3: Studies on risk factors for endothelial decompensation. Study Risk factors discussed in the researches Significant factors Not significant factors Lass et al.
In the warning, the FDA highlights the heightened risk of liver decompensation or failure if improper dosage is taken.