decoction

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de·coc·tion

(dē-kok'shŭn),
1. The process of boiling.
2. The pharmacopeial name for preparations made by boiling crude vegetable drugs, and then straining, in the proportion of 50 g of the drug to 1000 mL of water.
Synonym(s): apozem, apozema
[L. decoctio, fr. de-coquo, pp. -coctus, to boil down]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

decoction

Alternative medicine
A herbal medicine preparation in which the substrate (e.g., cinnamon bark, ginger root, nuts, seeds or coarse leaves) is hard or ligneous, making its extraction difficult; decoctions require grinding or pulverisation and then boiling to extract the volatile oil or substance of interest. 

Chinese medicine
A preparation of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs in which the dried herbs are placed in water, boiled until the volume is markedly reduced, and the dregs strained off; it results in virtually complete extraction of the herb’s essence and medicinal potential, as well as rapid absorption and onset of action.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

de·coc·tion

(dē-kok'shŭn)
1. The process of boiling.
2. The pharmacopeial name for preparations made by boiling crude vegetable drugs, and then straining, in the proportion of 50 g of the drug to 1000 mL of water.
Synonym(s): apozem, apozema.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

de·coc·tion

(dē-kok'shŭn)
1. The process of boiling.
2. The pharmacopeial name for preparations made by boiling crude vegetable drugs, and then straining them, in the proportion of 50 g of the drug to 1000 mL of water.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Both infusion and decoction are thermal procedures suitable for extracting heat-stable compounds leading to differences in the total phenolic content of decoct and infusion.
The crude ethanolic, aqueous, and hexane extracts, along with the decocted fruit, and distilled water have significantly different time to paralyze the test organism, Eudrilus eugeniae, which indicates that they do not have comparable effects as compared to the positive control, Levamisole.
during surgery (96) but also because it could be decocted into morphine
We learn how a dose of medicine was decocted, how an image was transferred to glass, how someone with ALS must walk in order not to fall.
Patients were given the Coccinia (decocted from fresh leaves, dried into a paste, and made into a 3-g tablet) twice a day for 12 weeks, although control group data only exist at 6 weeks.
Researchers found that when they decocted licorice root with coptis root (Coptidis chinensis), new compounds were formed that were not present in either herb.
Looking through a family photo album, a "picturebook of the afflicted" Suttree wonders "what deity in the realms of dementia, what rabid god decocted out of the smoking lobes of hydrophobia could have devised a keeping place for souls so poor as is this flesh" (130)?
Ning decocted the herbs, but the boy disliked the bitter liquid.
Indians from the Missouri River Valley decocted the fresh inner bark to make a soothing laxative.
But the electric light in thsi northern Venice is lavishly lunar in black waters, sneaks sideways off surfaces of gray and yellow the pale cast of thought, decocts castles and rococo.
This is, after all, what TV does: it discerns, decocts, and represents what it thinks U.S.
According to the experience of clinical application of ZSS, 10 g dried powder of ZSS (60 mesh sieve passed) was accurately weighed and decocted twice with boiling water (1:10, w/v and 1: 8, w/v, resp.), each for 1 h.