deciduous

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deciduous

 [de-sid´u-us]
falling off; subject to being shed, such as deciduous (primary) teeth. See tooth.

de·cid·u·ous

(dē-sid'yū-ŭs),
1. Not permanent; denoting that which eventually falls off.
2. In dentistry, often used to designate the first or primary dentition.
[L. deciduus, falling off]

deciduous

/de·cid·u·ous/ (dĕ-sid´u-us) falling off or shed at maturity, as the teeth of the first dentition.

deciduous

(dĭ-sĭj′o͞o-əs)
adj.
Of or relating to the primary teeth.

de·cid′u·ous·ly adv.
de·cid′u·ous·ness n.

deciduous

[də·sid′yo̅o̅·əs]
Etymology: L, decidere, to fall off
falling off or shed at maturity.

de·cid·u·ous

(dĕ-sij'ū-ŭs)
1. Not permanent; denoting that which eventually falls off.
2. dentistry Referring to the first or primary dentition.
See: deciduous tooth
[L. deciduus, falling off]

deciduous

Shed or falling at a particular time or stage of growth. Sometimes applied to the primary teeth.

de·cid·u·ous

(D) (dĕ-sij'ū-ŭs)
1. Not permanent; denoting that which eventually falls off.
2. In dentistry, the first or primary dentition.
[L. deciduus, falling off]

deciduous (dēsid´ūəs),

adj that which will be shed (exfoliated). Older term pertaining specifically to the first dentition. Preferred term is
primary.
deciduous dentition,
deciduous teeth,

deciduous

falling off; subject to being shed, as deciduous teeth.

deciduate, deciduous, decidual

characterized by shedding, e.g. teeth, placenta.

deciduate placenta, deciduate membrane
endothelial and hemochorial placentas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Deciduousness is a feature of trees within savannas across the world, with pronounced seasonal reductions in canopy cover as the dry season progresses.
The differences in the degree of deciduousness exhibited by the eucalypts in the present study may have been due to relative dominance within the forest stand.
Short duration of roots, persistence of succulent leaf bases, drought deciduousness of leaf blades (sometimes with attenuated longevity of leaf blades by means of succulence), and other features of this growth form must be taken into account.
The level and duration of deciduousness vary among tree species, but some as G.
The Cerrado landscape is composed of a vegetation mosaic ranging from grassland to forest formations differing from each other in structure and composition and levels of deciduousness ("campo limpo"--grassland, "campo sujo"--grassland with scattered trees, "cerrado sensu strict"--savanna--typical cerrado, and "cerradao"--woodland) (Ribeiro and Walter, 1998).
They were chosen in such a way as to encompass different degrees of deciduousness (deciduous or evergreen), sizes (shrubs or trees), and fire resistance strategies, with some species being able to withstand a fire due to their thick bark and other species suffering topkill and resprouting after the fire.
1) Seasonal Deciduous Forest (Tropical Dry Forest), found on rich or calcareous soils, presenting a tree stratum average 20 m tall with deciduousness above 50%, with two very distinct seasons (one rainy and another dry); it can be subdivided into: