deciduous tooth


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Related to deciduous tooth: milk tooth, Milk teeth, Temporary teeth

de·cid·u·ous tooth

[TA]
a tooth of the first set of teeth, comprising 20 in all, that erupts between 6-24 months of life.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

deciduous tooth

The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

de·cid·u·ous tooth

(dĕ-sij'ū-ŭs tūth) [TA]
One of the first set of teeth, comprising 20 in all, which erupt between the mean ages of 6 and 28 months of life.
Synonym(s): dens deciduus [TA] , baby tooth, deciduous dentition, milk dentition, milk tooth, primary dentition, primary tooth, temporary tooth.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
Enlarge picture
DECIDUOUS TEETH (LEFT SIDE)

deciduous tooth

Any of the 20 teeth that make up the primary dentition, which are shed and replaced by the permanent teeth.
Synonym: baby tooth; milk tooth; primary tooth See: illustration
See also: tooth
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

de·cid·u·ous tooth

(dĕ-sij'ū-ŭs tūth) [TA]
Tooth of the first set of teeth, comprising 20 in all, which erupts between 6-24 months of life.
Synonym(s): dens deciduus [TA] , baby tooth, dens lacteus, first dentition, milk dentition, milk tooth, primary dentition, temporary tooth.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Another disadvantage of zinc-oxide eugenol paste is that it results in problems with the coming permanent tooth and causes wastes in the tissues following the deciduous tooth since it is not resorbed in accordance with the root resorption (41,42).
In recent years, mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has become prominent in deciduous tooth endodontic treatments, and the current material is gradually being developed.
The deciduous tooth was prepared according to standardized preparation techniques with a chamfered margin.
It is not yet clear whether the retained deciduous tooth is the cause or the result of the displacement and ectopic eruption of its successor.
Premature loss is defined as "the loss of a deciduous tooth before the time of its natural exfoliation".1 The two most common causes of premature loss of deciduous teeth are dental caries and trauma.2,3
The radiographic error was corrected using Huckaba formula for which one deciduous tooth was measured both in the radiograph and in the model.
Key words: Premature birth, deciduous tooth eruption, and low birth weight
Stem cells have also been isolated from orofacial tissues that include adult tooth pulp tissue, deciduous tooth pulp tissue, periodontal ligament, apical papilla (SCAPs), dental follicle precursor cells (DFPCs) and buccal mucosa.
47 The placement of fissure sealants or composite restorations in these grooves should decrease the caries risk.48 The presence of double deciduous tooth can also cause delayed resorp- tion of root due to greater root mass and increased area of root surface relative to the size of the permanent successor crown.49
The presence of double deciduous tooth can cause delayed resorption of the root due to greater root mass and increased area of root surface relative to the size of the permanent successor crown.40