deciduous

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Related to deciduous plant: Deciduous trees

deciduous

 [de-sid´u-us]
falling off; subject to being shed, such as deciduous (primary) teeth. See tooth.

de·cid·u·ous

(dē-sid'yū-ŭs),
1. Not permanent; denoting that which eventually falls off.
2. In dentistry, often used to designate the first or primary dentition.
[L. deciduus, falling off]

deciduous

/de·cid·u·ous/ (dĕ-sid´u-us) falling off or shed at maturity, as the teeth of the first dentition.

deciduous

(dĭ-sĭj′o͞o-əs)
adj.
Of or relating to the primary teeth.

de·cid′u·ous·ly adv.
de·cid′u·ous·ness n.

deciduous

[də·sid′yo̅o̅·əs]
Etymology: L, decidere, to fall off
falling off or shed at maturity.

de·cid·u·ous

(dĕ-sij'ū-ŭs)
1. Not permanent; denoting that which eventually falls off.
2. dentistry Referring to the first or primary dentition.
See: deciduous tooth
[L. deciduus, falling off]

deciduous

Shed or falling at a particular time or stage of growth. Sometimes applied to the primary teeth.

de·cid·u·ous

(D) (dĕ-sij'ū-ŭs)
1. Not permanent; denoting that which eventually falls off.
2. In dentistry, the first or primary dentition.
[L. deciduus, falling off]

deciduous

falling off; subject to being shed, as deciduous teeth.

deciduate, deciduous, decidual

characterized by shedding, e.g. teeth, placenta.

deciduate placenta, deciduate membrane
endothelial and hemochorial placentas.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, in this study, the effects of evergreen plants on visual quality were lower than the deciduous plants (Table 5).
Since deciduous plants drop their leaves in the fall, they take on a whole new look for part of the year.
There still remains the need to identify plants specifically; for example, to recognize the difference between red oaks and live oaks or between zinnias and dahlias, or to recognize deciduous plants by their winter twigs after leaves, flowers, fruit, or other helpful features are gone.
However, Aerts (1997) argued that evergreens, even if they have similar resorption efficiency as deciduous plants, generally are more proficient because their peak nutrient concentrations usually are lower.
But unlike deciduous plants, evergreens have no marked period of dormancy and are generally moved in September and October when the soil is still warm and moist enough to encourage new root growth.
Evergreens added to the view provide a foil from the color changes put on by the deciduous plants.
Deciduous plants can be used for a more informal feel and extra interest as the seasons change.
If you buy into the notion that the garden is off-limits in winter (I donAAEt; mild winter days provide some of the best times for tackling projects), you might accept that there is less need for privacy and go for deciduous plants.
But wait until the leaves fall off on deciduous plants before moving them.
Prune deciduous plants Zones 7-9,14-17: To keep fruit and shade trees, grapes, and roses shapely, prune them while they're dormant.
Evergreens will provide colour all year, whereas deciduous plants only produce foliage colour during the summer.
You can move deciduous plants any time from now through to March.