deceleration


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Related to deceleration: deceleration injury, early deceleration

deceleration

 [de-sel″ĕ-ra´shun]
the sudden stopping of movement, a frequent mechanism of motion injury. Common causes of deceleration injury are motor vehicle accidents and falls.
early deceleration in fetal heart rate monitoring, a transient decrease in heart rate that coincides with the onset of a uterine contraction.
late deceleration in fetal heart rate monitoring, a transient decrease in heart rate occurring at or after the peak of a uterine contraction and resulting from fetal hypoxia.
variable d's in fetal heart rate monitoring, a transient series of decelerations in heart rate that vary in duration, intensity, and relation to uterine contractions; they are abrupt in onset and cessation and result from vagus nerve firing in response to stimuli such as umbilical cord compression in the first stage of labor.

de·cel·er·a·tion

(dē-sel'ĕr-ā'shŭn),
1. The act of decelerating.
2. The rate of decrease in velocity per unit of time.
A term referring to the slowing of the foetal heart in response to a reduction in maternal circulation

deceleration

Dip Obstetrics A periodic & transient slowing of the fetal heart rate in response to uterine contractions, ie stress. See Fetal heart monitor, Uniform deceleration, Variable deceleration.
Deceleration
Uniform deceleration The fetal heart response to uterine contractions; UCs are symmetrical, have a uniform temporal relation thereto and are divided into:
Early deceleration/Type I dip Due to vagal stimulation elicited in the first stage of labor by fetal head compression
Late deceleration/Type II dip Due to uteroplacental insufficiency, potentially associated with a less favorable outcome; may signal early vasomotor lability
Variable deceleration The fetal heart response is asynchronous with respect to uterine contractions; the curves on the fetal heart monitor are more angled and saw-toothed, and may be related to compromise in placental blood flow, eg umbilical cord compression and, like late decelerations, may signify parturition-related difficulties

de·cel·er·a·tion

(dē-sel'ĕr-ā'shŭn)
1. A slowing of contractions during the first stage of labor.
2. A slowing of the fetal heart rate during uterine contractions.
[de- + acceleration]

Deceleration

A decrease in the fetal heart rate that can indicate inadequate blood flow through the placenta.
Mentioned in: Antepartum Testing

de·cel·er·a·tion

(dē-sel'ĕr-ā'shŭn)
A slowing of contractions during the first stage of labor.
[de- + asceleration]
References in periodicals archive ?
After back-transforming the regression model, the best-fit line, lower prediction interval and upper prediction interval were reasonably well modeled using Equation 1 and deceleration rates of 0.35, 0.23 and 0.52 respectively (Figure 8).
Early decelerations occur at the onset of a contraction and don't determine a difference larger than 40 bpm from the baseline.
Since the coast-down testing sequence on day 1 was not controlled to match the testing sequence on day 2, deceleration values were randomized three times for each trajectory task before running the reliability test.
(25) The appellate court expressed that "[b]y voluntarily dismissing the [first] suit, Olympia [the foreclosing plaintiff] in effect decided not to accelerate payment on the note and mortgage at that time." (26) This statement invokes the core concept of deceleration: the undoing of a mortgage and note's acceleration to return the lending arrangement to status quo ante.
Retrospective stepwise logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the most efficient risk factors which caused to growth deceleration in Group C compared to Group A.
In order to improve passenger's comfort and to prevent frequent switching between the throttle control and braking control during the controlling process, a buffer zone for the deceleration value is set [19].
The BCT notes that most of the deceleration of loans to professionals concerned medium and long-term loans.
Assuming that a deceleration sub-phase occurs during BSQ with different loads, the duration of the deceleration sub-phase may be expected to increase as the load decreases.
By contrast, the fetal heart rate variable deceleration typically increases following the end of the maternal contraction/ pushing and is either stable or increases further (variable with slow recovery) prior to the next uterine contraction/pushing effort.
A rear-end collision is commonly induced by the sudden deceleration of the lead vehicle during a car-following process.
However, a comparison of empirical data indicates that the OV model exhibits significantly high acceleration and unrealistic deceleration; Helbing and Tilch [9] proposed a generalised force (GF) model by considering the negative velocity difference to overcome the abovementioned limitation.