decay


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Related to decay: exponential decay

decay

 [de-ka´]
1. the gradual decomposition of dead organic matter.
2. the process or stage of decline, as in old age.
tooth decay dental caries.

de·cay

(dĕ-kā'),
1. Destruction of an organic substance by slow combustion or gradual oxidation.
See also: memory.
2.
See also: memory. Synonym(s): putrefaction
3. To deteriorate; to undergo slow combustion or putrefaction.
See also: memory.
4. In dentistry, caries.
See also: memory.
5. psychology loss of information registered by the senses and processed into short-term memory.
See also: memory.
6. Loss of radioactivity with time; spontaneous emission of radiation or charged particles or both from an unstable nucleus.
[L. de, down, + cado, to fall]

decay

/de·cay/ (de-ka´)
1. the decomposition of dead matter.
2. the process of decline, as in aging.

beta decay  disintegration of the nucleus of an unstable radionuclide in which the mass number is unchanged, but atomic number is changed by 1, as a result of emission of a negatively or positively charged (beta) particle.
tooth decay  dental caries.

decay

(dĭ-kā′)
v. de·cayed, de·caying, de·cays
v.intr.
1. Biology To break down into component parts; rot.
2. Physics To disintegrate in a process of radioactive decay or particle decay.
3. Electronics To decrease gradually in magnitude. Used of voltage or current.
4. To decline in health or vigor; waste away.
n.
1.
a. The destruction or decomposition of organic matter as a result of bacterial or fungal action; rot.
b. Rotted matter.
2. Physics
a. See radioactive decay.
b. See particle decay.

de·cay′er n.

decay

[dikā′]
1 a gradual deterioration that accompanies the end of life.
2 a gradual deterioration, usually caused by bacteria and other decomposers, of the body of an organism after death.
3 the process of disintegration of a radioactive substance.

decay

Dentistry Caries, see there Medtalk Putrefaction, see there.

de·cay

(dĕ-kā')
1. Destruction of an organic substance by slow combustion or gradual oxidation.
2. Synonym(s): putrefaction.
3. To deteriorate; to undergo slow combustion or putrefaction.
4. dentistry Caries.
5. psychology Loss of information registered by the senses and processed into short-term memory.
See also: memory
6. Loss of radioactivity over time; spontaneous emission of radiation or charged particles or both from an unstable nucleus.
7. Synonym(s): disintegration.
[L. de, down, + cado, to fall]

decay

see BIODEGRADATION.

decay

the decomposition of dead tissue, mainly by the action of fungi and bacteria.

de·cay

(dĕ-kā')
1. In dentistry, caries.
2. Destruction of an organic substance by slow combustion or gradual oxidation.
3. Synonym(s): putrefaction.
4. To deteriorate; to undergo slow combustion or putrefaction.
[L. de, down, + cado, to fall]

decay,

v to decompose.
decay, dental,
n See caries.
decay product,
n See daughter.
decay, radioactive,
n the disintegration of the nucleus of an unstable nuclide by the spontaneous emission of charged particles and/or photons.
decay, senile,

decay

1. the gradual decomposition of dead organic matter.
2. the process or stage of decline, as in old age.
3. in radioactivity terminology the disintegration of the nucleus of an inactive nuclide by the spontaneous emission of alpha or beta particles. Called also radioactive disintegration. Substances produced by the disintegrations are called daughter (3) compounds.

decay-accelerating factor
a membrane-associated protein found on many cells, including peripheral blood cells, that inhibits the activity of complement.

Patient discussion about decay

Q. what would be the best way to protect my teeth from decaying?i fill pain always in my private parties,what prb whenever i take long with out sex,so i would like the advice from my fewwol

A. i fail to see the connection between teeth and groin pain...about the teeth. it's very very simple- get used to a healthy oral hygiene. brush your teeth in the right way twice a day for at least 6 minute. use floss. go to a dental hygienist, she'll guide you through it.

Q. Whether it`s possible for Bipolar disorder in children?

A. It is possible for children to suffer with bipolar disorder. It is a tricky diagnosis in children I would strongly suggest professional help when dealing with children with bipolar disorder.
I wouldnt trust the diagnosis of a GP, I would suggest getting a referal to a pediatric psychiatrist for a through evaluation and proper treatment

More discussions about decay
References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, tooth decay affects one in every two children, and its consequences, such as toothache, are immediate and costly to treat.
Although weve seen great improvements in tooth decay in school year 1 children over the last decade or so, there is scope for further improvement for the third of children still experiencing tooth decay.
That is plenty of time for the decay to be detected and treated before it becomes a cavity and requires a filling,' he said.
Dental tooth decay can be prevented by maintaining a constant low level of fluoride in the oral cavity.
The standard model does however, give a general link between the Breit-Wigner shape and the exponential decay time shape for a given particle which narrows down the uncertainty by telling us the favorite mass value of the particles is [M.
A root canal is recommended if the nerve in a tooth dies from decay or injury.
Thankfully, tooth decay in children can be prevented by following a healthy lifestyle and guidance from parents and carers.
The survey found more children in the north of England suffered with tooth decay than those in the south and east regions.
He said that the reason the decay is so rare is because it doesn't decay easily into the final quark particles that is known.
There are different approaches to managing decay in baby teeth and the FiCTION study will help establish which approach is best of all.
If left untreated, the decay eventually penetrates to the sensitive, soft dentine.
The Scheffer index, which was based on the idea of fast decay of wood under warm and moist conditions, has proved to be a reasonably useful tool to estimate microbiological deterioration of wood exposed aboveground to exterior conditions (Scheffer 1971, Larkin and Laks 2008, Morris and Wang 2008, Carll 2009).