debrief

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debrief

(dē-brēf′)
tr.v. de·briefed, de·briefing, de·briefs
To meet with (one who has undergone a traumatic or stressful experience), especially for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes.

debrief

(de?bref')
To question carefully and thoroughly a person, crew, or staff after completion of an operation in order to find out how successful the operation was and how to improve future operations. debriefing (?bref'ing)
See: brief
References in periodicals archive ?
Critical incident stress debriefing (CISD) helped this young nurse deal with the intense emotions and thoughts that followed: "The debriefing reassured me that what I was thinking and feeling was entirely normal in the circumstances.
Once learners are activated, real learning comes from the debriefing that occurs immediately following the simulation scenario.
For the past 10 years, simulation and debriefing have gained momentum as active teaching-learning strategies that successfully impact student thinking along the learning continuum (Jeffries, 2012).
2) A week or two later the EAP could offer voluntary groups, similar to Critical Incident Debriefings, to allow participants to talk about the impact of the situation on them personally and obtain more information.
The biggest obstacles to making this technique work, according to The FAA's Flight Instructor Handbook, are the student's lack of experience and objectivity, which result in an inability to properly assess his/her performance; the fatigue state of a student after a lesson, especially in the early stages of pilot training; and an instructor's lack of familiarity with good debriefing techniques.
Some reports written by detectives after debriefing sessions noted whether a prisoner attended mosque, celebrated Muslim holidays or had made a pilgrimage to Mecca.
Third, debriefing should last at least two to three times longer than the clinical scenario (Waxman, 2010).
The goal is to mitigate the impact of traumatic events, facilitate the recovery process, and restore adaptive functioning (Mitchell & Everly, 2000) Debriefing is a specific technique designed to assist in dealing with the physical or psychological symptoms generally associated with trauma exposure.
Debriefing is therefore an important strategy for teaching and learning in health care.
In this case, for example, it would be best to start by picking one of the "simpler" emergencies such as shoulder dystocia and run that scenario repeatedly until the people responsible for running the simulations feel comfortable and confident in the process of running simulations and debriefing trainees.
Several experiences from these missions and their follow-on debriefings have made me question our concepts of learning.
Although traditional onsite supervisor observations and debriefings of lessons taught by the NT are certainly highly desirable in providing experienced mentorship and focused progress for the NT, given the present educational climate, they are increasingly insufficient on their own toward improving the depth and breadth of pedagogical growth that can potentially be achieved through the addition of alternative forms of supplemental supervisory support.