debrief

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debrief

(dē-brēf′)
tr.v. de·briefed, de·briefing, de·briefs
To meet with (one who has undergone a traumatic or stressful experience), especially for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

debrief

(de?bref')
To question carefully and thoroughly a person, crew, or staff after completion of an operation in order to find out how successful the operation was and how to improve future operations. debriefing (?bref'ing)
See: brief
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Examination of data for all debriefers revealed that those who had training and competence assessment were more likely to practice TBD.
The February 2002 report said: "It is possible he does not know any further details; it is more likely this individual is intentionally misleading the debriefers".
A properly functioning trauma membrane, in Lindy's sense, might well act to keep debriefers away.)
Her findings indicated the importance of trust in choosing debriefers, the commitment of all parties to cultivate a high-quality product, and the developmental nature of the process.
(30) After interviewing Lanphier, Barber, Holmes, and Mitchell, the debriefers concluded that a total of three Betty bombers had been shot down in the mission, one each by Lanphier and Barber over Bougainville, and one by Holmes, with possible help from Barber and Hine, over the water.
Then came the kind of help the debriefers themselves would need to recalibrate their experiences daily before re-entering the fray.
debriefers, and like Ames, he betrayed precious national secrets.
The Post-Incident Stress Debriefing Program developed by the New York State Department of Correctional Services costs next to nothing because it relies entirely on correctional officers who have received training as debriefers at their own expense or through department training funded by federal grants.
The author strongly cautions that the debriefers are trained in this capacity; however, they do not necessarily need to be trained in counseling.
The principal debriefers are typically engineers or other technical personnel, and not always well-versed in the statutes and regulations governing evaluation of competitive proposals.
The first prerequisite for a successful debriefing is sound preparation by the debriefers. Ordinarily, the debriefers are the evaluators on the acquisition, and they should have a thorough understanding of the solicitation, the evaluation of the awardee, the evaluation of the offeror being briefed, and the proposal under consideration.
I then discussed these refined hypotheses with project debriefers who challenged me to consider alternate explanations and a new round of classroom observations, interviews, and analyses.