debilitate

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debilitate

(dĭ-bĭl′ĭ-tāt″)
To produce weakness or debility.
References in periodicals archive ?
This type of strategy was explicitly underpinned by distraction theories that suggest debilitative thoughts and worries impair performance (e.g., process efficiency theory; PET; Eysenck and Calvo, 1992).
Labels on students have long term debilitative affects beyond education.
From the focus group transcripts, it appeared that as the performers had increased levels of confidence in their (or their teammates') abilities, experiencing anxiety was reported to have a facilitative, rather than debilitative, impact on performance.
The distinction between facilitating and debilitative anxiety is another important factor that may help or hinder foreign language acquisition.
Measures included adaptations of the Achievement Anxiety Scale (Alpert and Haber, 1960) to assess facilitative and debilitative anxiety and the General Self-Efficacy Scale (Schwarzer & Jerusalem, 1995) to assess perceived efficacy to do well in class.
The debilitative effects of arthritis were evident among the majority of the respondents, affecting their day-to-day activities and their psychosocial functioning.
In addition to cancer, TGen and VARI eventually will study neurological and behavioral disorders as well as hearing loss and other debilitative conditions in dogs that could relate to people.
This can lead to a debilitative cycle of even less activity, further decreases in physical work capacity and more problems performing activities of daily living.
The goal is to educate all Soldiers and leaders to increase their awareness and understanding of these potentially debilitative health conditions.
The study addressed two questions: (a) whether an FI cognitive style affected Iranian EFL learners' language proficiency; and (b) if the answer to this first question was positive, whether an FI cognitive style was facilitative or debilitative. The study indicated that FI individuals were better achievers in language classes and that an FI cognitive style was conducive to language-learning.
They proposed that this occurs via an inhibition mechanism that protects working memory space from competing demands imposed by the goal hierarchy, and that traits such as the tendency to blame oneself for failures may exert debilitative effects on feedback by interfering with this inhibition mechanism.
The debilitative nature of statistics anxiety suggests that research into the nature of statistics anxiety holds great promise for improving statistics performance in the classroom.