debilitate

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debilitate

(dĭ-bĭl′ĭ-tāt″)
To produce weakness or debility.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Here, debilitation is proffered as a fate worse than death.
Trudy was one of 400,000 people, mainly women, who experience chronic pain and considerable debilitation from rheumatoid arthritis.
KARACHI -- Just hour before the Sindh Government filed appeal in the Supreme Court of Pakistan against the Sindh High Court verdict that declared the local government amendments and debilitation as illegal, MQM filed a petition, pleading to become party in the case.
It could have been there for three to five years, according to my surgeon Ian Dunn, without any apparent sign of any debilitation.
"If successful, this nonsurgical treatment could halt OA--and the pain and debilitation it causes--in its tracks."
If successful, their nonsurgical treatment could make OA - and the pain and debilitation it causes - halt in its tracks, he said.
SAN FRANCISCO--Women with atrial fibrillation have significantly more debilitation than do men with the disorder, but the men have double the cardiovascular death rate of their female counterparts, according to data from more than 10,000 U.S.
He went on by saying that the recent Eurogroup decision on Cyprus, on March 25, is "exhausting" Cyprus, imposing the debilitation of its two largest banks.
It is becoming ever more clear that communities need to again take on the critical agendas and proactive work that will help us all be prepared for the local impacts of such serious global threats as climate change, economic debilitation and polar melt.
October 16, 2012 (KHARTOUM) -- Youth members of the opposition National Umma Party (NUP) in Sudan have strongly criticized party leader Al-Sadiq Al-Mahdi, blaming his opaque positions for the debilitation of the party and strengthening of the regime.
The simple message that all NHS Wales staff need to remember is that the sooner treatment is started the lower the risk of death or debilitation. Time is critical: For every hour delay in administering antibiotics in septic shock, mortality increases by 7.6%.
Actinomyces bovis is the primary etiologic agent of actinomycosis in the cattle and is an important cause of economic losses in livestock because of its widespread occurrence and poor response to the routine clinical treatment (Blowey and Weaver, 1990).The losses occur directly from the debilitation of affected cattle and indirectly from the slaughter of animals.