death point


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death point

n.
An environmental limit, as of temperature or radiation, beyond which a specified life form cannot survive: the thermal death point of bacteria.
References in periodicals archive ?
To determine the thermal death point, 150 [micro]L each of embryonated eggs, at a concentration of 100 eggs per [micro]L were added to six 1-mL polypropylene tubes of sterile water.
Evidence gathered after Richard's death pointed to the boys being smothered while they slept.
\"The stagnant water ponds are the death points for the rural population of the district\", said a social worker and a local journalist Muhammad Zubair.
The MoD only tracks serving officers and a Freedom of Information Act request revealed seven personnel had taken their own lives while there were 14 cases where the cause of death pointed towards suicide.
The MoD only track serving officers and a freedom of information request revealed seven personnel had taken their own lives and 14 cases where the cause of death pointed to suicide.
Police insisted that all evidence in the tragic newlywed's death pointed to suicide.
She then battled through five rounds of sparring, winning the quarter-final and final rounds on sudden death points to take the Gold.
Each premature death points out not only the preciousness of our time here, but also the preciousness of those around us.
For example, the prospect of reaping financial gain from the death points toward prosecution, whereas evidence that compassion was the only motivation will indicate that prosecution is not in the public interest.
"When a review of a death points to failures on the part of the state, which acts as the child's parent when in care, the sense of tragedy is accentuated."
The point on which city residents agree: that Anthos's death points up the need to add sexual orientation protections to Michigan's existing hate-crimes law.
Indeed, quoting Barthes, Le Roux-Kieken acknowledges the "scandale grammatical" (9) of any attempt to speak death; similarly, her focus on the self inhabited and therefore fragmented by death points to the possibilities of a nonorganicist, nontotalizing reading of Proust.