death instinct


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instinct

 [in´stinkt]
a complex of unlearned responses characteristic of a species. adj., adj instinc´tive.
death instinct Freud's concept of an unconscious drive toward dissolution and death, in opposition to the life instinct.
herd instinct the instinct or urge to be one of a group and to conform to its standards of conduct and opinion.
life instinct Freud's concept of all the constructive tendencies of the organism aimed at maintenance and perpetuation of the individual and species, in opposition to the death instinct.

death in·stinct

an instinct of living creatures toward self-destruction, death, or a return to the inorganic lifelessness from which they arose.
Synonym(s): aggressive instinct

death instinct

n.
A primitive impulse for destruction, decay, and death, postulated by Sigmund Freud as coexisting with and opposing the life instinct. Also called Thanatos.

death in·stinct

(deth in'stingkt)
The instinct of all living creatures toward self-destruction, death, or a return to the inorganic lifelessness from which they arose.
References in periodicals archive ?
Considering how the Kleinian eros is fueled by the death instinct
One must stress the importance of aggression, the means by which the organism protects itself against the death instinct, but which also allows aggression to reach expression via its deflection from the psyche onto an object.
The text plays with the tension between the pleasure principle and the death instinct, showing that Pym's motions are governed by the compulsion to repeat; however, if the Freudian notion of repetition--as a source of terror--is linked to the uncanny and Gothic sublimity, Pym's lack of closure points--rather than to Eros or Thanatos--to the postmodern trapping of the subject in an incessant pattern of repetitions and duplications, in which the ultimate denouement is forever deferred and postponed.
For Freud's most complete discussions on the "death instinct," see Civilization and its Discontents (1930), The Ego and the Id (1923), and Beyond the Pleasure Principle (1920).
Human Hope and the Death Instinct (1971) takes Freud, Sartre, and R.
The "tragic sense of life" for which Trilling would lobby in later decades is latent in this strategic passivity, needing only the philosophical warrant of Freud's "death instinct" to be elevated from a Weltschmerz to a Weltanschauung.
For example, Buero's masterpiece, El tragaluz, which receives more attention than any of the other plays discussed, is explored variously from a Freudian perspective emphasizing the death instinct; with concepts of marginality for understanding the importance of a small physical prop (a forgotten paper doll); from an intertextuality perspective that aids in the evaluation of a reference to the medieval play, El misterio de Elche; and with the notion of "uchronian fiction" for understanding Buero's beliefs about present and future morality.
the DeAth instinCt by JeD rubenfelD (headline review pounds 18.99)
There is also the aspect of thanatos, the death instinct. The sad reality is that all organismsmen and the nations they populatecarry within them the seeds of their own end.
Ali of this is of course reminiscent of Freud; for it was he, in Beyond the Pleasure Principle (1920), who formulated the notion of the "death instinct." But actually, the convergence of the two thinkers is still more interesting because in Freud's conception the death instinct is inextricably linked to the problem of repetition compulsion.
The second of the two-part biopic, "Mesrine: Public Enemy Number One" staged a socko first five days for Pathe, earning $4.7 million on 500 while "Mesrine: Death Instinct" was down only 28% in its fifth frame for a cume of $15.9 million.
It is where the urge to build and prosper crashes headlong, albeit at a snail's pace, into its opposite: the death instinct. We jump into our cars full of the desire to go out and make a living for ourselves and our families and then we just sit in these glorified tin cans vegetating for days, months and years on end.