death instinct


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instinct

 [in´stinkt]
a complex of unlearned responses characteristic of a species. adj., adj instinc´tive.
death instinct Freud's concept of an unconscious drive toward dissolution and death, in opposition to the life instinct.
herd instinct the instinct or urge to be one of a group and to conform to its standards of conduct and opinion.
life instinct Freud's concept of all the constructive tendencies of the organism aimed at maintenance and perpetuation of the individual and species, in opposition to the death instinct.

death in·stinct

an instinct of living creatures toward self-destruction, death, or a return to the inorganic lifelessness from which they arose.
Synonym(s): aggressive instinct

death instinct

n.
A primitive impulse for destruction, decay, and death, postulated by Sigmund Freud as coexisting with and opposing the life instinct. Also called Thanatos.

death instinct

instinctive behavior that tends to be self-destructive.

death in·stinct

(deth in'stingkt)
The instinct of all living creatures toward self-destruction, death, or a return to the inorganic lifelessness from which they arose.
References in periodicals archive ?
In such a scenario, the war dance kongonya, seems to paradoxically exude both the life and death instincts freedom and death.
One is satisfaction of the need, epitomized by the search for the object, love and the expression of the life instinct; the second is the obliteration of the need, in other words the expression of the death instinct.
The text plays with the tension between the pleasure principle and the death instinct, showing that Pym's motions are governed by the compulsion to repeat; however, if the Freudian notion of repetition--as a source of terror--is linked to the uncanny and Gothic sublimity, Pym's lack of closure points--rather than to Eros or Thanatos--to the postmodern trapping of the subject in an incessant pattern of repetitions and duplications, in which the ultimate denouement is forever deferred and postponed.
According to Freud, the life instinct, containing the sexual instincts and that of self-preservation, finds itself in a constant struggle for supremacy with the death instinct, which is a destructiveness directed against the self and seeking to return to an earlier tension-less state prior to birth, since 'the aim of all life is death.
Klein proposed in her later work that a primordial battle between the life instinct and the death instinct, each represented by fantasies, is waged in the psyche of an infant from birth.
Mesrine: Public Enemy No1 is the second of a two-part work based on the autobiography Death Instinct by Jacques Mesrine, one of France's most infamous criminals.
For example, Freud drew on Sanskrit ideas for his Nirvana principle or death instinct.
He is said to be "vehemently opposed to any psychoanalytic reading of his work,"[1] but we don't need much psychoanalytic understanding to see the narcissistic basis of his photographs, and to see that they reek of the death instinct, like all good German art.
He, further, infers that "we might suppose that the life instincts or sexual instincts which are active in each cell take the other cells as their object, that they partly neutralize the death instincts (that is, the processes set up by them) in those cells and thus preserve their life" (Freud 50).
One of the central themes is their interpretation of Freud's later theory of instinct, the theory of life and death instincts that he formulated in 1920.
It is a corpus haunted by death work, death instincts, locked in a poetic of absence and negation.
There on the tube was the universe from which he'd been banished: nubile chainsaw massacres and nightmares on Elm Street, tabloid news shows serving up slo-mo reenactments of the sex crimes of the day, misogynist rappers and hate comics reciting brutal nursery rhymes, the basic death instincts on parade like so many Robocops of the id.