death anxiety


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death anxiety

The apprehension, worry, or fear related to death or dying.
See also: anxiety
References in periodicals archive ?
Death Anxiety : HIV is such a disease that has no cure; therefore it is a severe disease that ultimately leads to death.
Keywords: Death anxiety, ego integrity, physical health status, older adults
Relations among nightmare frequency and ego strength, death anxiety, and sex of college students.
Even so, seen through the lens of this book, one can't help thinking if President Duterte's murderous view of drug offenders and his narcissistic estimation of his role in the nation's life are not a reflection of his own desperate attempt to manage death anxiety.
Bodner, Shrira, Bergman, Cohen-Fridel, and Grossman (2014) described death anxiety as an emotional state of terror that people possess as a response to the knowledge of their mortality.
Cross-cultural studies are important ways of establishing the parameters of any particular phenomenon including death anxiety [6].
Data was gathered using a questionnaire and Death Anxiety Scale was applied.
Conclusions: ASDA(C) has adequate psychometrics and properties that make it a reliable and valid scale to assess death anxiety in Mandarin-speaking Chinese.
The first is that psychological factors such as depression and anxiety level increase death anxiety. The second is the view that the neurotic feat of death stems from the unconscious, adolescent and birth traumas [4].
Unfortunately, our culture offers an inadequate antidote to death anxiety, pushing us to success as a nation, while leaving us anxious, driven, and unhappy.
TMT offers a social psychological and empirical framework to investigate the impact of worldview threat and death anxiety on human thoughts and behavior.
Self-report measures included an assessment of individuals' attitudes to death and dying using the Death Anxiety Scale (Templer, 1970), and belief in what comes after death using the Belief in the Afterlife Scale (Osarchuk & Tatz, 1973).