deaf-blind


Also found in: Dictionary, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

deaf-blind

or

deafblind

(dĕf′blĭnd′)
adj.
Being both deaf and blind.

deaf′-blind′ness, deaf′blind′ness n.

deaf-blind

A person who has a severe hearing impairment in addition to a visual defect. It is usually congenital but it may result from ageing or some systemic disease or as part of a syndrome (e.g. Usher's syndrome which accounts for about half of all cases of deaf-blind people; rubella syndrome).
References in periodicals archive ?
"Local authorities have a key role in identifying deaf-blind people in their area and providing appropriate support services."
In the past, individuals who were deaf-blind needed someone else to interpret/read printed material for them.
There are about 390,000 deaf-blind people in the UK, which is set to increase to over 600,000 by 2035.
Paul Daley, whose daughter is deaf-blind and nonverbal and is also a member of the Deaf-Blind Multihandicapped Association of Texas, described the disability community as "the only one that you can join, any day." He urged the board to put Helen Keller back into the curriculum standards.
But if we expand our dress-for-success wardrobe to include a light, thin headset microphone, our voices could pass into our smartphones' speech recognition or pass to a centralized server to become captions viewable by the deaf and felt by the deaf-blind. Moreover, if our LCD wall screens were prepared for captions at the bottom of the screen, then the deaf and deaf-blind could participate by texting their contributions for all to see, and that text could be spoken aloud through TTS.
Clyburn added, "Tasks that are seemingly simple for many of us, such as sending emails or chatting on the phone, can be difficult or even impossible for deaf-blind individuals if they do not have access to adaptive equipment."
SUMMARY : The Commission will consider an Order to extend the National Deaf-Blind Equipment Distribution Program and a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to permanently extend the program.
Deaf-Blind Reality: Living the Life offers a more complete exploration of what life is like for people with a combination of vision and hearing loss, gathering the results of interviews with twelve deaf-blind individuals, including himself, who live around the world.
It was after reluctantly accepting an invitation to lead a drama workshop for deaf-blind people that Tal, transfortned by the experience, founded Nalaga'at in 2002, and in 2007 spearheaded the opening of the Nagala'at Center, which includes not only a theatre but the BlackOut Restaurant, serviced by blind waiters, and the sign-language-only Cafe Kapish, where the servers are deaf.
A feasibility and planning study committee recently presented a proposal to the Iowa State Board of Regents that would create five regional centers, including on existing campuses in Vinton and Council Bluffs, to serve students who are blind, deaf, deaf-blind, including those with additional disabilities.
Aiming to present the reality of the lives of deaf-blind individuals to people who interact with them, Stoffel, a retired systems engineer and freelance writer, draws on interviews with 12 deaf-blind individuals, including himself, from the US, UK, New Zealand, and South Africa to illustrate what life is like for them, rather than providing stories of inspiration that can often be the focus of books.