deadly nightshade


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bel·la·don·na

(bel'ă-don'ă),
Atropa belladonna (family Solanaceae); a perennial herb with dark or yellow purple flowers and shining purplish-black berries; the leaves (0.3% belladonna alkaloids) and root (0.5% belladonna alkaloids) orginally were sources of atropine scopalamine and related alkaloids, which are anticholinergic. Belladonna is used as a powder (0.3% belladonna alkaloids, calculated as hyoscyamine) and tincture in the treatment of diarrhea, asthma, colic, and hyperacidity.
Synonym(s): deadly nightshade
[It. bella, beautiful, + donna, lady]

belladonna

Drug slang
A regional term for phencyclidine (PCP).
 
Herbal medicine
A perennial herb which is highly toxic if taken internally at full concentration; belladonna contains scopolamine and hyoscyamine, which are used as antispasmodics in mainstream medicine and for gout and rheumatism in herbal medicine.
 
Toxicity
Belladonna causes diarrhoea, dilated pupils, dry mouth, flushing, hallucinations, hypertension, incoordination, nausea, speech impairment, tachycardia, vision impairment, vomiting, coma, possibly death.

Homeopathy B
elladonna is used for conditions of abrupt onset, acute infections, cough, earache, fever, headaches, seizures, sore throat, teething in children, urinary tract infections.

Ophthalmology
Belladonna derivatives—e.g., homatropine eye drops—are instilled into the eye to dilate the pupil

bel·la·don·na

(bel'ă-don'ă)
Atropa belladonna; a perennial herb with dark purple flowers and berries. Originally used as a source of atropine.
Synonym(s): deadly nightshade.
[It. bella, beautiful, + donna, lady]

deadly nightshade

The source of the drug BELLADONNA.
References in periodicals archive ?
Codwarth (Atropa belladonna; Deadly nightshade) Llun: Bethan Wyn Jones
Deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna) intoxication: An analysis of 49 children.
* Belladonna (Deadly nightshade): Right-sided, hot, red, burning pain.
The name belladonna means "beautiful woman", referring to the fashionable custom of ladies in medieval courts who would place a few drops of deadly nightshade juice in their eyes to dilate their pupils.
Deadly nightshade is a Zone 3 perennial that can grow in full sun to partial shade, with the most potent alkaloids occurring in sunnier plantings.
(1, 13) There are many beautiful flowers and ornamentals as petunia and Angel's trumpet, luscious vegetables, important medicinal drugs, such as atropine (dilates eye pupil), belladonna (relieves spasms, stimulates heart), and scopolamine (in sleeping pills), tobacco, and the many poisonous plants, such as Jimsonweed (Datura stramonium), deadly nightshade (Solanum nigrum), and the foul smelling henbane (Hyoscyamus niger).
They finally linked her symptoms to eating berries from the shrub Atropa belladonna, or deadly nightshade, which grows near her home.
A sharp-eyed doctor realised that Mrs Agutter had a higher dosage of the deadly nightshade derivative in her system than the other victims.
This erroneous belief may have stemmed from tomatoes belonging to the Solanaceae or deadly nightshade family, which also includes eggplant, peppers and potatoes.
The berries of the deadly nightshade plant caused a rapid, but painful death.
"You will get some plants you may not want, like deadly nightshade, poison ivy, pokeberry or Russian olive, which will take over everything." Letting your hedgerow get too big, or too unmanaged, could put you in conflict with local weed-control ordinances.
Belladonna is an atropine powder derived from the leaves and roots of Atropa belladonna, a poisonous Eurasian plant popularly known as "deadly nightshade." In any event, Wilson was apparently never able to recapture his original high (which he in his later years would call his "hot flash") and continued to seek some form of spiritual bans formation.