dead fetus

dead fetus

As defined by statutory language in the US, an expelled or delivered fetus that exhibits no heartbeat, spontaneous respiratory activity, spontaneous movement of voluntary muscles, or pulsation of the umbilical cord (if still attached) [45 CFR 46.203(f)].
References in periodicals archive ?
For dead fetus, surgery is typically specified due to the danger of contamination and DIC.
A dead fetus was found in a garbage bin inside a transport terminal in Muntinlupa City on Thursday afternoon.
Cervical dilation failure is commonly observed, subsequent to correction of uterine torsion and is considered a major obstacle in vaginal fetal delivery (Prabhakar et al., 2007) especially in the presence of a dead fetus. Most uterine torsions do not warrant surgical intervention and caesarean section is never performed as the first choice.
On 15 December 2015 the patient underwent cystoscopy, which revealed in the cavity of the urinary bladder a dead fetus, embryonic vesicle, and fragments of the umbilical cord (Figure 2).
Out of thirteen goats, two were diagnosed as having dead twins (Figure 1) and 11 were diagnosed as having single dead fetus (Figure 2).
(c) The opened ileum revealing a dead fetus. (d) Photograph showing the placenta in the uterus after detaching the ileum from the uterine fundus.
A live fetus was defined as one that responds to stimuli; a dead fetus was defined as a term fetus not demonstrating marked to extreme autolysis [28].
Limitations of the study: A previous study20 suggested that, different types of umbilical abnormality could induce dead fetus. But in this study, the survival rate of fetus was 100%, which was a quite positive outcome.
soil in May, involving a dead fetus that a woman turned over to health authorities.
However, we are aware of at least 2 clinical cases in which fetal cardiac activity was convincingly documented at admission and for several hours intrapartum with subsequent episodic loss of signal and then delivery of a dead fetus wherein retrospective review confirmed that for a period of time the maternal heart rate was recorded and interpreted to be the fetal heart rate.
After the piano solo midway, "First Miracle," a succession of four songs follows; "Superhero (Birth One)," a sweet expression of confidence; "From the Start (Birth Two)," recounting the first moments after birth; "Five Days (Birth Three)," a heartbreaking account of carrying a dead fetus to term ("five days, while heartbreaking, were also a gift"); and the exultant duet, "I Did It!" with its constant meter changes and triumphant [E.sub.[flat]] major heralding the birth of twins.