sign

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sign

 [sīn]
1. any objective evidence of disease or dysfunction.
2. an observable physical phenomenon so frequently associated with a given condition as to be considered indicative of its presence. See also names of specific signs such as tinel's sign.
sign/symptom a term used in the omaha system, defined as both objective and subjective evidence of a health problem. See also sign and symptom.
sign/symptom, mental/emotional in the omaha system, objective or subjective evidence of a mental or emotional health problem; it may include conditions such as depressed feelings, confusion, agitation, or suicidal threats.
sign/symptom, physical in the omaha system, objective or subjective evidence of a physical health problem; it may include conditions such as elevated temperature, failure to thrive, a statement of pain, or others.
vital s's the signs of life, namely pulse, respiration, and temperature.
sign (omaha) in the omaha system, on the fourth level of the problem classification scheme, the objective evidence of a client problem as observed by a community health nurse or other health care provider; this is closely related to the problem modifier actual. See also sign/symptom.

sign

(sīn),
1. Any abnormality indicative of disease, discoverable on examination of the patient; an objective indication of disease, in contrast to a symptom, which is a subjective indication of disease.
2. An abbreviation or symbol.
3. psychology any object or artifact (stimulus) that represents a specific thing or conveys a specific idea to the person who perceives it.
[L. signum, mark]

sign

(sīn)
n.
Medicine An objective finding, usually detected on physical examination, from a laboratory test, or on an x-ray, that indicates the presence of abnormality or disease.
v. signed, signing, signs

sign′er n.

sign

An objective clinical defect or change that is associated with a particular disorder.

SIGN

Sottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network. An organisation established in 1993 by the Academy of Royal Colleges and their Faculties in Scotland, and approved by NHS Evidence, to develop evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for NHS-Scotland, and protocols for treating certain diseases and conditions—e.g., diabetes and back pain.

sign

Medtalk A defect or abnormality which is associated with a particular disorder. Related terms are Accordion sign, Air meniscus sign, Amputation sign, Angel wing sign, Aortic nipple sign, Apical cap sign, Applesauce sign, Arrowhead sign, Asterisk sign, Bald sac sign, Banana sign, Battle sign, Beak sign, Bird's sign, Bird beak sign, Blade of grass sign, Blue tongue sign, Bowler hat sign, Bozzolo sign, Branham sign, Broken ring sign, Broken straw sign, Brudzinski sign, Candy cane sign, Carman's meniscus sign, Cat's paw sign, Celery stick sign, Chaddock sign, Chadwick sign, 'Chandelier sign,' Chinese lantern sign, Chvostek sign, Clenched fist sign, Cluster of grapes sign, Cobrahead sign, Collar sign, Colon cut-off sign, Comet tail sign, Cracked-pot sign, Cracker sign, Curbstone sign, Cullen sign, Cut-off sign, Dagger sign, Deciduous tree in winter sign, Delta sign, DeMusset sign, Dimple sign, Doll's eye sign, Donohue-Fauver sign, Double bubble sign, Double condom sign, Double duct sign, Double wall sign, Dough sign, Doughnut sign, Drawer sign, Drooping lily sign, E sign, Einstein sign, Ellipse sign, Ewart sign, Eyelash sign, FBI sign, Fifth vital sign, Figure 3 sign, Fishhook sign, Flag sign, Flat waist sign, Football sign, Friend sign, Frog sign, Grey Turner sign, Groove sign, H bomb sign, Half moon sign, Hampton sign, Head drop sign, Heel pad sign, Hegar sign, Hill sign, Hilum overlay sign, Hoffman sign, Homan sign, Hot air balloon sign, Hump sign, Hump & dip sign, Iceberg sign, Inverted comma sign, Inverted mushroom & stem sign, Inverted 3 sign, Inverted U sign, Inverted umbrella sign, Jail bars sign, Jello sign, Jet sign, Joffrey sign, Kussmaul sign, Kehr sign, Kernig sign, Kestenbaum sign, Key sign, Keyhole sign, Lachman sign, Lasègue sign, Lemon sign, Lhermitte sign, Lipstick sign, Luftsichel sign, Marcus Gunn sign, McMurray sign, Meningeal sign, Meniscus sign, Mickey Mouse sign, Milk rejection sign, Möbius sign, Mogul sign, Monocle sign, Moro sign, Moviegoer sign, Mulder sign, Musset sign, Napoleon's hat sign, Nikolsky's sign, Notch sign, Nuchal translucency sign, Numb chin sign, Number 3 sign, Ober sign, Obturator sign, Okra sign, Omega sign, One bone-two bone sign, One sign, two sign, three sign, Overhanging ledge sign, Osler sign, Padlock sign, Pencil-in-cup sign, Peninsula sign, Phalen sign, Playboy Bunny sign, Plump hilus sign, Psoas sign, Puddle sign, Pyloric string sign, Pyriform sign, Quarter moon sign, Reverse 5 sign, Reverse 3 sign, Rigid loop sign, Rim sign, Ring sign, Romberg sign, Rope sign, Rovsing sign, Sagging rope sign, Sail sign, Sanctuary sign, Scarf sign, Scotty dog sign, Setting sun sign, Shaggy heart sign, Shelf sign, Signet ring sign, Snowman sign, Snow white sign, Square root sign, Step-off sign, String sign, String of beads sign, Sulcus sign, Terry Thomas sign, Thorn sign, Thumb & little finger sign, Thumb sign, Thymic wave sign, Tinnel sign, Tinted spectacles sign, Tit sign, Tooth sign, Toothpaste sign, Track sign, Trident sign, Twinkling star sign, Vacuum sign, Vital sign, 'Waiter accepting a tip' sign, Wall sign, Water lily sign, Westermark sign, Westphal sign, Whalebone in a corset sign, White line sign, Winterbottom sign, Wrist sign

sign

(sīn)
1. Any abnormality indicative of disease, discoverable on examination of a patient; an objective symptom of disease, in contrast to a symptom, which is a subjective sign of disease.
2. An abbreviation or symbol.
3. psychology Any object or artifact (stimulus) that represents a specific thing or conveys a specific idea to the person who perceives it.

sign

An objective indication of disease, perceptible by an external observer. Compare SYMPTOM.

sign 

Objective evidence of a disease as distinguished from symptom, which is a subjective complaint of a patient. See diagnosis; prognosis.
Argyll Robertson sign See Argyll Robertson pupil.
Bell's sign Bell's phenomenon occurring on the affected side in Bell's palsy.
Bjerrum's sign See Bjerrum's scotoma.
Cogan's lid twitch sign A twitch of the upper eyelid in an eye with ptosis when the patient is asked to look in the primary position following a downward look. The eyelid then returns to its ptosis position. This condition occurs in myasthenia gravis.
Collier's sign Unilateral, or more commonly bilateral, eyelid retraction that exposes an unusual amount of the sclera of the eye above and below the iris; it gives the person a frightened or startled expression. It is due to a midbrain lesion. See Parinaud's syndrome.
sign convention A set of conventions regulating the direction of distances, lengths, and angles measured in geometrical optics. The most common is the New Cartesian Sign Convention. It stipulates: (1) All distances are measured from the lens, refracting surface or mirror. Those in the same direction as the incident light, which is drawn travelling from left to right, are positive. Those in the opposite direction are negative. (2) All distances are measured from the axis. Those above are positive. Those below are negative. (3) Angles are measured from the incident ray to the axis, with anticlockwise angles positive and clockwise angles negative. (4) The power of a converging lens is positive and that of a diverging lens is negative (Fig. S7). See focal length; Lagrange's law; law of refraction; Newton's formula; fundamental paraxial equation.
Dalrymple's sign Retraction of the eyelids causing an abnormally widened palpebral fissure, in primary gaze. This is a sign of Graves' disease. The patient appears to stare and to be frightened as some white sclera may be seen above the upper limbus.
doll's eye sign See doll's head phenomenon.
von Graefe's sign Immobility or lagging of the upper eyelid when looking downward. This is a sign of Graves' disease.
Gunn's crossing sign Tapering of veins on either side of the arteriovenous crossings seen in hypertensive retinopathy.
Hutchinson's sign A triad of signs present in congenital syphilis. They are interstitial keratitis, notched teeth and deafness.
local sign See oculocentric direction.
Moebius' sign Convergence weakness occurring in Graves' disease.
Mizuo's sign See Mizuo's phenomenon.
Munson's sign A sign observed in keratoconus in which the lower lid is bulging as a cone when the patient looks downward.
pseudo-von Graefe sign See aberrant regeneration.
Rizzuti's sign An arrowhead pattern near the nasal part of the corneoscleral limbus, sometimes seen in advanced keratoconus.
Salus' sign Retinal vein deflection from its normal course at arteriovenous crossings seen in hypertensive retinopathy.
Seidel's sign See Seidel's scotoma.
Shafer's sign The presence of pigment granules of various sizes floating in the anterior vitreous. They usually result from a retinal break/s, which may progress into rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Then the pigment cells appear as small black dust-like particles ('tobacco dust') seen on clinical examination.
Vogt's sign Loss of the normal shagreen of the front surface of the crystalline lens indicating anterior capsular cataract. See crocodile shagreen.
Uhthoff's sign See Uhthoff's symptom.
Fig. S7 Sign convention at a spherical refracting surface S (O, object; A, vertex; C, centre of curvature; I, image; n , n ′, refractive indices)enlarge picture
Fig. S7 Sign convention at a spherical refracting surface S (O, object; A, vertex; C, centre of curvature; I, image; n, n′, refractive indices)

sign

(sīn)
Any abnormality indicative of disease, discoverable on examination of patient; objective indication of disease, in contrast to a symptom, which is a subjective indication of disease.
[L. signum, mark]