daydream

(redirected from daydreams)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

daydream

Mental musing or fantasy while awake.
References in periodicals archive ?
Speaking about her vision for the salon, Bianca added: "I wanted Scarlet Belle and Dolly Daydreams to be luxurious both in the interior and in the services that we offer.
After decades of working as an anthropologist and a shaman, I learned that enlightened seekers--what I call "Luminous Warriors"--know three kinds of waking dreams: the nightmare, the daydream, and the sacred dream.
Recent research suggests that work-related daydreams may serve as a central feature of a highly personalized qualitative career assessment strategy grounded in the narrative approach (Pisarik, Rowell, & Currie, 2013).
Their daydreams are more intense and they may not respond or hear you if you call their name.
It is a technique used by many celebrities, sporting heroes and business leaders - inventor Tim Berners-Lee claims he came up with the concept of the internet in a daydream.
Daydreams have many benefits, helping you rehearse conversations, visualize every step in a process, see the big picture, boost energy and motivation by what you can envision for yourself, and build empathy by imagining how other people feel, Fries says.
Even so, it's a great daydream, and perfect for racing, as well as for crosswords.
They concluded that, "understanding the dilemmas of others and the resolutions possible can be very instructive for someone who feels stuck and alone" and that, "guided imagery and daydreams are method[s] for discovering rich social comparison data" (p.
It has long been recognized that personal daydreams about ourselves have relevance for career planning and are a relatively good predictor of vocational choice (Brown & Brooks, 1991; Touchton & Magoon, 1977; Yanico, 1981).
While winning the lottery is our favourite daydream, only four percent of women from Liverpool daydreams about sex!
To cope with the pain of missing home, you may often resort to daydreams about your family, pet, room, friends, or your familiar routine.
Proust observed, through the character of the painter Elstir, that the only way to "cure" a daydream is to daydream more rather than less: "One must have a thorough understanding of one's daydreams if one is not to be troubled by them." Indeed I came to look upon my runway debut as an act of mental hygiene.