cybernetics

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cybernetics

 [si″ber-net´iks]
the science of communication and control in the animal and in the machine.

cy·ber·net·ics

(sī'ber-net'iks),
1. The comparative study of computers and the human nervous system, with intent to explain the functioning of the brain.
See also: feedback.
2. The science of control and communication in both living and nonliving systems; characteristically, control is governed by feedback, that is, by communication within the system concerning the difference between the actual and the desired result, action then being modified so as to minimize this difference.
See also: feedback.
[G. kybernētica, things pertaining to control or piloting]

cybernetics

(sī′bər-nĕt′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The theoretical study of communication and control processes in biological, mechanical, and electronic systems, especially the comparison of these processes in biological and artificial systems.

cy′ber·net′ic adj.
cy′ber·net′i·cal·ly adv.
cy′ber·net′i·cist, cy′ber·ne·ti′cian (-nĭ-tĭsh′ən) n.

cybernetics

The formal study of the functions of human control and the mechanical and electronic devices designed to replace them.

cy·ber·net·ics

(sī'bĕr-net'iks)
1. The comparative study of computers and the human nervous system, with intent to explain the functioning of the brain.
2. The science of control and communication in both living and nonliving systems; characteristically, control is governed by feedback, that is, by communication within the system concerning the difference between the actual and the desired result, action then being modified so as to minimize this difference.
See also: feedback
[G. kybernētika, things pertaining to control or piloting]

cybernetics

The study of the control and communication systems common to machines and animals, including the human being. The study of the analogies between complex feedback control systems and human physiology has been fruitful to both disciplines.

cybernetics

the study of the comparison of control in the workings of the living body with man-made mechanical systems such as are used in robots.
References in periodicals archive ?
Van Dijck (2014) observes a kind of "dataism," which is the idea that people trust objective quantifications based on the automated logging of human habits more than they do their own subjective perceptions.
Van Dijck points out how this connects with "dataism," the secular belief--part of the surveillance imaginary, in my terms--that users can safely entrust their data to large corporations.
Datafictaion, dataism and dataveillance: Big data between scientific paradigm and ideology.