darwinism


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darwinism

 [dar´wĭ-nizm]
the theory of evolution stating that change in a species over time is partly the result of a process of natural selection, which enables the species to continually adapt to its changing environment.

darwinism

/dar·win·ism/ (dahr´win-izm) the theory of evolution stating that change in a species over time is partly the result of a process of natural selection, which enables the species to continually adapt to its changing environment.

Darwinism

(där′wĭ-nĭz′əm)
n.
A theory of biological evolution developed by Charles Darwin and others, stating that all species of organisms have developed from other species, primarily through natural selection. Also called Darwinian theory.

Dar′win·ist n.
Dar′win·is′tic adj.

darwinism

The current paradigm of evolution, which holds that cumulative changes in successive generations of organisms—i.e., evolution of species—results from mutation and natural selection of the organisms that are best adapted phenotypically to survive in an environment—i.e., ‘survival of the fittest’

Darwinism

the theory of evolution formulated by Charles DARWIN that holds that different species of plants and animals have arisen by a process of slow and gradual changes over successive generations, brought about by NATURAL SELECTION. The essential points of Darwin's theory are:
  1. in organisms that reproduce sexually there is a wide range of variability, both within and between species.
  2. all living forms have the potential for a rapid rise in numbers, increasing at a geometric rate.
  3. the fact that populations usually remain within a limited size must indicate a ‘struggle for existence’ in which those individuals unsuited to the particular conditions operating at that time are eliminated or fail to breed as successfully as others (see FITNESS).
  4. the struggle for existence results in natural selection that favours the survival of the best-adapted individuals, a process described by Herbert Spencer (1820–93) in his Principles of Biology (1865) as the ‘survival of the fittest’.

darwinism

the theory of evolution according to which higher organisms have been developed from lower ones through the influence of natural selection.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the same time, the explosion of critical work in the last two decades in cultural science studies--taking up key evolutionary issues ranging from social Darwinisms like eugenics to evolutionary mysticisms such as Theosophy--simply does not register in this volume, with the only and marginal exceptions of Stephen Kern's Culture of Time and Space of 1983, and Katherine Hayles's The Cosmic Web of 1984, which is about physical field theory, not evolutionary biology.
I do not intend to imply that Social Darwinism was the dominant collective abstraction of Western culture during the 19th century.
We tell the pupils about the Bible's version, Darwinism and the Big Bang.
77) We may read this as poverty and insecurity being inherent (a) even in "God's country" (economy) and (b) even in "God's kingdom" (church), justified partly through both Social Darwinism and through a scriptural appeal ("the poor you will always have with you," John 12:8).
The anthropological pessimism of social Darwinism has slipped towards this voluntarist ideology which is eugenics.
Thus, the paradox: Of One Blood reflects a Darwinist outlook on history at the same time that it opposes and undermines a racism deeply informed by Darwinism.
In doing so, the book thankfully unties itself from constant reference to the Darwinism, highlighting much of the current baggage IT should leave behind - the idea that its function is to control, reduce and manage costs; that IT strategy is an afterthought of corporate strategy; that it is rarely synchronised to overall business goals; and that it is seen as a liability and not an opportunity.
What was especially interesting to me about the case studies "down under" was how receptive the local communities were to Darwinism.
Caudill then argues that the supposed acceptance of Darwinism was in part due to the publicity campaign waged in the periodical press by Darwin's friends and supporters, particularly T.
Its detractors make constant reference to economic or social Darwinism.
Conkin: When All The Gods Trembled: Darwinism, Scopes, and American Intellectuals.
Mike Hawkins's book, Social Darwinism in European and American Thought, 18601945, is (1) an attempt to expand greatly the size of the group that may be charged under this indictment, and (2) a defense of some who would otherwise be found guilty under the expanded definition of the crime.