Dogwood

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A tree used by Native Americans as antipyretic and laxative, and by Western herbalists as an appetite stimulant, and to treat renal and hepatic disease
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
THE NEXT DAY, I GREEDILY RECLAIM DAGWOOD, and after a while, I'm not even holding his lead.
With almost everybody flaunting a camera thanks to the mobile phone cams and numerous platforms to upload them on, physical albums have given way to e albums and nobody pours as lovingly over pictures in the company of one's family like Dagwood did.
"A Quick Look At American Comic Strips" provided a predictable overview of syndicated strips, favoring middle-class mishaps such as Dagwood Bumstead's eternal problems with his boss J.
Were we to personify moles--an endeavour that wouldn't be out of keeping with the spirit of Brown's novel--we might be tempted to term the narrator's view of moles "paranoid," and it may also be paranoia that leads him to simply accept his dermatologist's implication that there is no way for him to get professional help with his moles unless he participates in the kidnaping, because the membership of dermatologists in DAGWOOD is essentially all-inclusive.
Under a photo of a box jellyfish (that looks like an extra-terrestrial skull) is a postcard reproduction of "The Arlington Court Regeneration," and under it a postage stamp of Dagwood Bumstead serving himself one of his towering midnight-snack sandwiches.
At the same time, representatives of white sovereignty make their appearance: Spiderman hovers on a ceiling, and Blondie's Dagwood, quintessential white man, frets his way through his morning routine on the way to his daily pursuit of the American Dream.
In 1949, King Features Syndicate loaned its characters for Dagwood Splits the Atom, which explained atomic power in simplified form.
The overall championship from the horse and pony sections last week went to Sarah Baker with her eight-year-old liver chestnut mare, Dagwood Saffire - winner of the lead rein mountain and moorland class with son, William, in the saddle.
To retain any illusion of dangerousness, one had better avoid the Oz-man's 21st-century incarnation on so-called "reality TV" (there's a particularly potent oxymoron for you) as a sort of seedy Aquarian version of the hen-pecked Dagwood Bumstead.
And of course, the Dagwood, named for that beleaguered husband in the famous comic strip Blondie, presents a good analogy for our more-is-better attitude toward food, as well as our inventiveness.
Indeed I remember with some amusement having a stand at the Sydney Royal Easter Show of all places and the bewilderment and incomprehension shown by some visitors to the stand more used to sideshow alley, show bags and dagwood dogs.
One of my associates put a "Dagwood and Blonde" cartoon on my door in my office, and it shows Dagwood going in to return a cell phone that he has bought.