cytostasis


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Related to cytostasis: Cytostatics

cy·tos·ta·sis

(sī-tos'tă-sis),
The slowing of movement and accumulation of blood cells, especially polymorphonuclear leukocytes, in the capillaries, as in a region of inflammation; obstruction of a capillary as the result of accumulated leukocytes.
[cyto- + G. stasis, standing]

cytostasis

(sī′tə-stā′sĭs, -stăs′ĭs)
n.
Arrest of cellular growth and multiplication.

cy·tos·ta·sis

(sī-tos'tă-sis)
The slowing of movement and accumulation of blood cells, especially polymorphonuclear leukocytes, in the capillaries, as in a region of inflammation; obstruction of a capillary as the result of accumulated leukocytes.
[cyto- + G. stasis, standing]
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References in periodicals archive ?
However, no statistically significant differences were detected in NPB and NBUD frequencies (other chromosomal DNA damage parameters) and frequency of BN cells and NDI values (cytostasis) between the patients with multinodular goiter and control subjects (p > 0.05, Table 2).
Nitric oxide regulates a variety of physiological functions including relaxation of vascular smooth muscle, long-term potentiation, tumor cell apoptosis, and cytostasis [3].
(e) The upregulation of both ROS and stress response pathway in cancer cells which make them susceptible to cytostasis by antioxidant treatment (due to unbalanced stress response) [284]
The cells resist apoptosis and face malignant progression through cytostasis, thus causally contributing to cell senescence induction and maintenance.
Evidence of tumour cell cytostasis and cytotoxity was found in macrophage-tumour cell cocultures in which cytokine- and/or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages inhibited metabolic functioning of co-cultured tumour cells (5).
Nathan, "Nitric oxide: a macrophage product responsible for cytostasis and respiratory inhibition in tumor target cells," Journal of Experimental Medicine, vol.
Chaudhuri, "Nitric oxide-induced cytostasis and cell cycle arrest of a human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231): potential role of cyclin D1," Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol.