cytoskeleton

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cytoskeleton

 [si″to-skel´ĕ-ton]
a conspicuous internal reinforcement in the cytoplasm of a cell, consisting of tonofibrils, filaments of the terminal web, and other microfilaments. adj., adj cytoskel´etal.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cy·to·skel·e·ton

(sī'tō-skel'ĕ-ton),
In cells, the microtubules and the filaments (thin, intermediate, and thick) that serve as supportive cytoplasmic elements to stiffen cells or to organize the location and movement of intracellular organelles.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cytoskeleton

(sī′tə-skĕl′ĭ-tn)
n.
The internal framework of a eukaryotic cell, composed of protein filaments that provide structural support and drive the movement of the cell and its internal components, typically divided into three categories (microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules) based on the diameter and composition of the filaments.

cy′to·skel′e·tal (-ĭ-tl) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cy·to·skel·e·ton

(sī'tō-skel'ĕ-tŏn)
The tonofilaments, keratin, desmin, neurofilaments, or other intermediate filaments serving as supportive cytoplasmic elements to stiffen cells or to organize intracellular organelles.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cytoskeleton

A complex network of ACTIN filaments within the nucleated cell. Unlike the bony skeleton in vertebrates, this skeleton has contractile properties and can alter the shape, size and even movement, of the cell. The cytoskeleton is also concerned with the adhesion of adjacent cells.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

cytoskeleton

a network of MICROTUBULES and MICROFILAMENTS in the cytoplasm of cells which is thought to give the cell its characteristic shape. The network enables the movement of specific organelles within the cytoplasm (as in vesicles produced by the GOLGI APPARATUS), and the production of general CYTOPLASMIC STREAMING.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

cy·to·skel·e·ton

(sī'tō-skel'ĕ-tŏn)
The tonofilaments, keratin, desmin, neurofilaments, or other intermediate filaments serving as supportive cytoplasmic elements to stiffen cells or to organize intracellular organelles.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
As the effector of Rho GTPase, PAK4 controls the cytoskeleton primarily through the regulation of polymerized actin structures, particularly the formation of filopodia and lamellipodia, but can also act upon microtubule organization [9].
In this study, we hypothesized that VILI induced EMP release by altering the cytoskeleton in which PAK4 was involved.
Moreover, thapsigargin, a specific irreversible inhibitor of ER calcium-ATPase, has been used to investigate the effect of a disturbed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium homeostasis on different processes of cells, including cytoskeleton dynamics.
To examine the critical role between calcium signaling, cytoskeleton, and cell apoptosis, we focus on the effect of ectopic entry of calcium influx by thapsigargin on actin cytoskeleton apoptosis in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines.
In addition, the distribution of F-actin was examined with Texas Red phalloidin in cytoskeletons of molluscan (N.
The images of blood clam erythrocyte cytoskeletons obtained with the new method (e.g., [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1A, A[PRIME] OMITTED]) are superior, in terms of three-dimensional structure and retention of representative samples to those obtained previously with polylysine.
Horwitz reported at the Keystone integrins meeting that he and his colleagues at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have isolated a set of proteins that may link integrins to actin, a major constituent of the cytoskeleton. His team and others have evidence that the cytoplasmic tails of integrins--which dangle in the cell's watery interior, or cytoplasm--bind to these proteins.
One well-studied network is the membrane-associated cytoskeleton of the human red blood cell-a two-dimensional network whose elements are tetramers of the protein spectrin.
Although the cytoskeleton chains appear convoluted in the simulation, the chain junctions (the white disks in [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1 OMITTED]) fluctuate only slightly around their mean positions.
In this model, IFs provide the core while plectin forms peripheral linkers that connect to MTs, the actin-based cytoskeleton, and membrane structures.
Improved procedures for electron microscopic visualization of the cytoskeleton of cultured cells.
For transmission electron microscopy of cytoskeletons, fresh hemolymph obtained at 6 [degrees] C was diluted into Triton lysis medium containing 0.1% glutaraldehyde, incubated 1 h at about 22 [degrees] C, stored 3 days at 0 [degrees] C with glutaraldehyde added to 1%, and post-fixed 1 h in 1% Os[O.sub.4] buffered with 0.1 M [KH.sub.2][PO.sub.4]-KOH at pH 6.8.