cytology

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cytology

 [si-tol´o-je]
the study of cells, their origin, structure, function, and pathology. adj., adj cytolog´ic.
aspiration biopsy cytology (ABC) the microscopic study of cells from superficial or internal lesions obtained by aspiration biopsy.
exfoliative cytology microscopic examination of cells desquamated from a body surface or lesion, done to detect malignancy or microbiologic changes, to measure hormonal levels, and for other purposes. The cells may be obtained by such procedures as aspiration, washing, smear, and scraping, and the technique may also be applied to secretions such as sputum, urine, abdominal fluid, prostatic secretions, and vaginal secretions.

cy·tol·o·gy

(sī-tol'ō-jē),
The study of the anatomy, physiology, pathology, and chemistry of the cell.
[cyto- + G. logos, study]

cytology

(sī-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The branch of biology that deals with the formation, structure, and function of cells.

cy′to·log′ic (-tə-lŏj′ĭk), cy′to·log′i·cal adj.
cy·tol′o·gist n.

cytology

Cell biology
The biology of structure, function, multiplication, pathology, and history of cells. In the working parlance, “cell biology” is preferred to “cytology,” given the obvious potential for confusion with health professionals (cytologists and cytotechnologists) who examine cell specimens to render clinical diagnoses. Those who study such phenomena are called cell biologists, not cytologists.

Medspeak
The formal discipline in which cells are studied and the changes seen correlated with the clinical findings in patients.
 
Pathology
The microscopic examination of body fluids for the detection of disease; in cytology, the most common specimen is the Pap smear, a normal component of a gynaecologic examination which is the best means of detecting early, curable stages of cancer of the uterine cervix—formerly the most common cause of death in sexually active women—as well as viral, fungal and other infections of the female genital tract. Cytology specimens can be obtained from various fluids (urine, CSF, or sputum or discharges) specifically as a means of detecting abnormal or malignant cells.

cytology

1. The formal discipline in which cells are studied and the changes seen correlated with the clinical findings in Pts.
2. Cytologic examination, cytologic study The microscopic examination of body fluids for the detection of disease; in cytology, the most common specimen is the Pap smear, a normal component of a gynecologic examination and is the best means of detecting early, curable stages of cancer the uterine cervix–formerly the most common cause of death in sexually active ♀ as well as viral, fungal and other infections of the ♀ genital tract; cytology specimens can be obtained from various fluids–urine, CSF, or sputum or discharges, specifically as a means of detecting abnormal or malignant cells. See Aspiration cytology, Automated cytology, Bile cytology, Brush cytology, Exfoliative cytology, Fine needle aspiration cytology, Needle aspiration cytology, Ocular cytology, Pap smear, Screening, Touch cytology, Urine cytology.

cy·tol·o·gy

(sī-tol'ŏ-jē)
The study of the anatomy, physiology, pathology, and chemistry of the cell.
Synonym(s): cellular biology.
[cyto- + G. logos, study]

cytology

1. The study of cells.
2. An abbreviation of the phrase ‘exfoliative cytology’ the examination of isolated cells, obtained from cervical smears, sputum or elsewhere, to determine whether or not they are cancerous.

cytology

the study of cells.

cytology 

A study of cells to detect diseases. The usual procedure is to obtain a sample, to fix it on a glass slide, treat it with various dyes and inspect it under a microscope. Differential staining allows identification of the cells and their state of health.

cy·tol·o·gy

(sī-tol'ŏ-jē)
The study of the anatomy, physiology, pathology, and chemistry of the cell.
[cyto- + G. logos, study]
References in periodicals archive ?
However, although spontaneous and induced rearrangements were of interest on purely genetic and cytogenetic grounds, it was their role as polymorphisms in natural populations, their mode of ixation, and their possible role as postmating isolating mechanisms that attracted the interest of grasshopper cytologists.
When the patient's mucin was placed on slides for cytologists to analyze, no cancer cells or malignancy of any kind could be found.
When a cytologist finds no malignant cells in a sample of the pancreatic juice or tissue obtained from a mucinous tumor, the elderly patient who has been advised to undergo a Whipple procedure faces a dilemma and major life decision.
The starting salaries for cytologists is pounds 10,843 and for medical technical officers pounds 10,090.
This would be on top of the 500,000 now called back for further tests because their smears are found to be abnormal, said consultant pathologist Dr Jane Johnson, president of the British Society of Clinical Cytologists. She said the extra cost - and the psychological and physical effects on the women involved - would be incalculable.
Nearly 1,200 women in Britain die each year from cervical cancer and the constant blaming of screeners is beginning to take its toll.Eileen Hewer, president of the National Association of Cytologists, said: "We've had some unfortunate incidents in the past and I think we have addressed those issues.
Specimens from all three groups were analyzed by the same cytologists, who were blinded to subjects' smoking status.
He was especially close to the cytologists Franz and Sally Schrader.
Cytologists (specialists who study cells) at the National Naval Medical Center were credited with "excellent early detection work" for Mrs.
The advent of cytology and availability of experienced cytologists has diminished the diagnostic role of excision biopsy, especially with regard to breast lumps.
We do have good pathologists but not many good cytologists who can read abnormal cytology biopsy.